Active Grant Support

Jahnigen Career Development Scholars Award

NIH K07 Cancer Prevention, Control, and Population Sciences Career Development Award
(1K07CA13098-01A1)

K07 CA134923. This is an Established Investigator Award from NCI that supports Dr. Goodwin 30% for mentoring junior faculty. These activities overlap with the MTT on CER.

K08 AG31583-01. This is a Career Development Award from NIA that supports Dr. Sharma 80% time for developing a research program in CER in relationship to ICU care and end of life care. The K08 overlaps with the goals of the MTT on CER.

"Underutilization of Surgical Resection in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer"

The goal of this research is to describe the evaluation process of patients with locoregional and metastatic pancreatic cancer including specialist visits and key diagnostic tests to describe the patient, tumor, surgeon, hospital volume, and medical system characteristics which predict the receipt of surgical evaluation and surgery in patients with locoregional pancreatic cancer. This grant also evaluates the extent of and trends in regionalization of care to high-volume centers (> 10 pancreatic resections per year) among Medicare patients with locoregional and metastatic pancreatic cancer and assesses variability in care among Medicare providers performing pancreatic resection.

Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas – CPRIT – Quality of Post-treatment Surveillance for Cancer Patients in Texas (RP101207). 7/1/2010-7/1/2013

The primary goal of surveillance following curative treatment for cancer, regardless of site, is to detect local recurrence or distant disease at a time when survival can be prolonged by interventions designed to cure or at least treat the disease more effectively than when discovered later. Secondary goals include patient and physician reassurance, introduction of palliative chemotherapy and/or radiation to slow disease progression, and early referral to hospice when the further therapy is not indicated. For cancers, such as breast and colorectal, where recurrences and second primary cancers amenable to cure commonly occur, the argument for surveillance is compelling. In contrast, for cancers such as lung and pancreas, there is little to no evidence that early identification of metastatic disease in asymptomatic patients improves long-term survival and the other potential benefits of post-treatment surveillance have not been systematically studied.