« Back

ECI Launch Child Development

infant, being held

The changes babies and toddlers go through are made up of different skills, like walking and talking. These skills, or Developmental Milestones, usually happen by certain ages.

Although each child is special and develops at his or her own pace, watching to see when your child reaches these milestones can help you know how your child is developing.

Developmental Milestones

3 months

  • Turn toward bright colors and lights
  • Follow moving toys or faces with their eyes
  • Recognize or know the bottle or breast
  • Respond to loud or new sounds
  • Reach for and grasp toys or hair
  • Wiggle and kick with legs and arms
  • Lift head and shoulders up while on stomach
  • Smile back at parents or other family members
  • Make sounds, like gurgling, cooing or babbling
  • Reacts (jumps) to loud sounds
  • Can be soothed by a familiar voice
  • Makes verbal noises
  • Will "talk" back and forth with parents.

6 months

  • Turn toward voices
  • Reach for toys and pick them up
  • Roll over front-to-back and back to front
  • Play with their toes
  • Help hold the bottle during feedings, if bottle fed
  • Know faces of family members
  • Babble, squeal, and repeat vowel sounds, like ooh, -ae, -e
  • Sit by leaning on their hands
  • Turns head toward interesting sounds
  • Responds to quiet talking
  • Will awaken to a loud noise
  • Responds when you say baby's name
  • Enjoys rattles and other toys that make sounds

9 months

  • Copy sounds or gestures
  • Reach for crumbs or other small things with their thumb and fingers
  • Move toys from one hand to the other hand
  • Support themselves with straightened arms when on their stomachs
  • Sit unassisted
  • Turns head toward interesting sounds
  • Responds to quiet talking
  • Will awaken to a loud noise
  • Responds when you say baby's name
  • Enjoys rattles and other toys that make sounds

12 months

  • Respond to their name
  • May be scared of strangers
  • Look for an object if you hide it from them, even if they can't see it
  • Crawl on hands and knees
  • Pull themselves up to a standing position
  • Walk by holding onto furniture
  • Drink from a cup with your help
  • Enjoy playing games, like peek-a-boo or patty cake
  • Says 1 to 2 words
  • Can point and look at familiar people or objects when asked to
  • Uses voice to get your attention
  • Begins to say simple words like "mama" or "bye"
  • Imitates words you say
  • Enjoys music

15 months

  • Use gestures
  • Like to look at pictures in a book
  • Can hold a crayon in a fist
  • Hand toys to you when asked
  • Can point to pictures you name, if the things in the picture are familiar
  • Walk alone without help
  • Can point and look at familiar people or objects when asked to
  • Uses voice to get your attention
  • Begins to say simple words like "mama" or "bye"
  • Imitates words you say
  • Enjoys music

18 months

  • Like to pull and push things
  • Follow simple directions
  • Pull off shoes and socks
  • Feed themselves sometimes
  • Step off low objects and keep their balance
  • Turn 2 to 3 pages of a book at a time
  • Can point to one body part
  • Can name one object
  • Like to copy your words or actions

20 months

  • Can name 2 objects
  • Like to pretend-play
  • Can put together a simple picture
  • Puzzle if it has only 2 or 3 large pieces
  • Like to throw balls
  • Like to play alone with toys for a short time
  • Says "No" a lot

24 months

  • Use 2 to 3 words together, like "No, Mommy" or "More cookies"
  • Say names of toys and people
  • Feed themselves with a spoon
  • Turn one page at a time
  • Point to hair, eyes and nose when someone asks them
  • Show affection to family members and pets
  • Run short distances without falling

36 months

  • Answer simple questions
  • Walk up steps, alternating feet
  • Put their clothes on by themselves
  • Open simple containers
  • Like to play with other children
  • Repeat simple rhymes and songs
  • Use 3 to 5 word sentences
  • Name at least one color correctly
  • Jump in place
  • Express their emotions

Preemies

Did your baby have an extended stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) due to complications?

Do you have questions about your baby's future developmental needs?

"Infants born too early are at higher risk than full-term babies for medical and developmental complications, which can affect the growing baby and family well into childhood."

- New Perspectives on Premature Infants and their Parents, Zero to Three - November 2003, Vol. 24 No. 2

Premature infants often require special care after leaving the NICU. Early intervention programs pay careful attention to your baby\'s ability to eat, sleep, make eye contact, and respond to your love and attention. Behaviors to watch for as your infant plays and interacts:

When I need a break, I may:

  • Be irritable or fussy
  • Appear unable to focus on faces or objects
  • Avoid direct eye contact

To help me calm down and rest, you may:

  • Dim or turn off lights
  • Limit noises and sounds
  • Hold me quietly and avoid eye contact

To calm myself, I may:

  • Look away
  • Bring my hands to my face or try sucking
  • Get into a tucked position

When I want to play again, I may:

  • Look at you, paying close attention
  • Have bright, shiny eyes
  • Smile or have a relaxed expression

Hearing

A hearing screening is very important to your baby. Hearing loss happens to 3 out of 1,000 babies. It is one of the most common birth disabilities. Language learning starts at birth. If your baby can't, hear learning language is hard. A hearing test lets you catch the problem early. If you find hearing loss early, your baby can get help. If you start before your baby is 6 months old, he or she may learn language like babies who do not have hearing loss.

Texas Early Detection Hearing & Intervention (TEDHI) Protocol
To ensure that all infants and toddlers with hearing loss are identified as early as possible and provided with timely and appropriate audiological, educational, and medical intervention, an early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) program is essential. Here are some forms to assist in detection:


Reach Us Here
 
Telephone:(281) 534-6755
FAX:(281) 534-4270
Mailing Address:
301 University Blvd.
Galveston TX 77555-1025
Physical Address:
304 Tanglewood
Dickinson, TX 77359
Email:marggrif@UTMB.EDU
 

UTMB's ECI Launch is part of a statewide program sponsored by the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services.

Third Column

Curabitur posuere, pede vitae lacinia accumsan, enim nibh elementum orci, ut volutpat eros sapien nec sapien. Suspendisse neque arcu, ultrices commodo, pellentesque sit amet, ultricies ut, ipsum. Mauris et eros eget erat dapibus mollis. Mauris laoreet posuere odio. Nam ipsum ligula, ullamcorper eu, fringilla at, lacinia ut, augue. Nullam nunc.