Experimental Pathology Graduate Program

Course of Study for the Experimental Pathology Graduate Program 2012-2013

BBSC Core Courses-Year 1 Course
Director
Course
Number
Term/Year
Cell Biology Lewis BBSC 6302 I/A
Biochemistry Barral BBSC 6401 I/A
Molecular Biology & Genetics Beasley/Pyles BBSC 6403 II/A
Biostatistics & Exp. Design Spratt BBSC 6122 III/A
Laboratory Rotations Coppenhaver BBSC 6301 I,II,III/A

ExPath Program-Year 1 Course
Director
Course
Number
Term/Year
Principles of Laboratory Biosafety Brocard BBSC 6217 I/A
Basic Human Pathobiology Hawkins PATH 6266 II/A
Basic Human Pathobiology-ID or Olano PATH 6386 II/A
Basic Human Pathobiology-Tox Boor/Khan PATH 6276 II/A
Fundamentals of Pathology Olano PATH 6203 III/A
Frontiers of Infectious Diseases Valbuena PATH 6145 I,II/A
Program Electives (3 cr)

ExPath Program-Year 2 Course
Director
Course
Number
Term/Year
Intro to Competitive Grant Writing Rockx/Vasilakis PATH 6279 I/A
ExPath Trainee Work in Progress McBride PATH 6115 I,II/A
Research in Pathology McBride PATH 6097 I,II,III/A
Frontiers of Infectious Diseases Valbuena PATH 6145 I or II/A
Program Electives (3 cr)

Program Electives Course Director Course Number Term/Year
Introduction to Vaccinology Milligan/Barrett PATH 6161 I/A
Workshop in Phylogenetics Forrester PATH 6211 I/B
Principles of Biodefense Peters PATH 6310 I/A
General Virology Nichols/Bente MICR 6403 I/A
Foundations of Virology Murphy PATH 6140 II/A
Cardiovascular Toxicology Boor PATH 6242 II/A
Cellular Microbiology & Disease Aguilar PATH 6289 II/B
Tropical Diseases Melby/Travi PATH 6318 II/A
Advanced Immunology Soong/Milligan MICR 6408 II/A
Teaching Skills & Course Devel. Aronson PATH 6101/6102 II,III/B
Biology of Arthropod Dis Vectors Thangamani PATH 6112 III/A
Fundamentals of Inflammation Hawkins BBSC 6210 III/A
Vaccine Development Pathway Barrett/Milligan BBSC 6219 III/A
Advanced Cell Biology Tang CELL 6307 III/A
Pathogenic Bacteriology Eaves-Pyles/Endsley MICR 6315 III/A
Clinical Microbiology Practicum Bouyer/Loeffelholz PATH 6123 I,II,III/A
Research Rotations McBride PATH 6012 I,II,III/A
Thesis McBride PATH 6098 I,II,III/A
Dissertation McBride PATH 6099 I,II,III/A
Seminar in Pathology McBride PATH 6195 I,II,III/A
Special Topics McBride PATH 6000 I,II,III/A

Key: I = Fall, II = Spring, III = Summer, A = Annual, B = Biennial.


Grades for Required Core Courses: Pathobiology of Human Diseases Parts I & II, Experimental Design and Introduction to Competitive Grant Writing, and Teaching in Pathology

1. Students must obtain a B grade or better in all required courses.

2. Accumulation of two C grades in graduate school constitutes grounds for dismissal from graduate school at UTMB. In addition, a grade of C in the core courses of this program will be deemed a deficiency which will have to be corrected. This will involve repeating all or parts of courses where a grade C or lower was obtained and require a grade B or better when the parts of the course are repeated. Decisions on which parts of courses require repeating will involve discussions of the respective course director with the Student Evaluation and Advisory Committee (SEAC).

3. A grade of F will require the entire course to be retaken and a grade of B or better obtained on repeating the course.

Academic Progress

1. Students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 or better. This includes all courses and rotations.

2. A student will be put on probation if the average GPA falls below 3.0 in any one semester. Students whose average in the subsequent semester does not achieve 3.0 or better are subject to dismissal from graduate school.

M.D. /Ph.D. Curriculum in Experimental Pathology

Experimental Pathology will require a minimum of 9 hours of classes. Coursework must include PATH 6266 entitled Basic Human Pathobiology, PATH 6276 Basic Human Pathobiology-Toxicology or PATH 6286 Basic Human Pathobiology-Infectious Disease, and an elective course appropriate for the student's area of specialization within the Experimental Pathology program. The academic record of each M.D./Ph.D. student will be evaluated by the Program Director and if deficiencies are noted, additional coursework may be required.

STUDENTS MAY BE EXEMPTED FROM EXPERIMENTAL PATHOLOGY AND BBSC REQUIRED CORE COURSES BASED ON THEIR PRIOR ACADEMIC RECORD IN GRADUATE COURSES PREVIOUSLY TAKEN. EXEMPTION FROM BBSC COURSES CAN ALSO BE DETERMINED BY EXAMINATIONS. OTHER EXEMPTIONS MAY BE MADE DEPENDING ON THE BACKGROUND OR QUALIFICATIONS OF THE STUDENT AT THE DISCRETION OF THE STUDENT EVALUATION AND ADVISORY COMMITTEE (SEAC), THE PROGRAM DIRECTOR, AND THE DIRECTOR OF THE BBSC.

List of Conferences and Seminars at UTMB

Attending seminars is a critical part of the training program. Since Pathology is uniquely positioned at the interface between basic sciences and clinical medicine, Experimental Pathology graduate students have an exceptional opportunity to interact with clinicians regarding observations and unknowns in human disease. Departmental seminars provide formats for such interactions on a regular basis.

UTMB offers numerous seminars and conferences sponsored by various departments, programs, centers and interest groups. Information about these seminars is disseminated through a variety of mechanisms including UTMB Daily Announcements, the weekly "UTMB Yellow Sheet", http://research.utmb.edu/research/yellowsheet/ysonline.htm, the UTMB web site, posted announcements, and in targeted emails. The number and diversity of seminar opportunities precludes a detailed listing of them. Listed below are several conferences/seminars that directly relate to many of the students in Experimental Pathology.

Experimental Pathology Trainee Work in Progress (PATH 6115) (weekly, fall//spring terms) – Thursday, 12 Noon, GNL 1.100. Trainees in Pathology, including graduate students and post-doctoral fellows engaged in research, present their current findings to their peers, faculty and staff. Graduate students in their first year in the program present 30-minute talks, while more senior students and post-doctoral fellows present 60-minute talks. This seminar series serves several purposes: 1) to provide trainees the opportunity to develop their verbal presentation skills; 2) to provide a forum for trainees to receive input into their research; and 3) to help develop a cohesive identity among trainees interested in the diverse research topics within the Department of Pathology. Graduate students are expected to attend all of these seminars; not attending will affect your grade. Written evaluations are prepared by faculty and students. The results of these evaluations are summarized and provided to the speaker and the speaker's mentor.

Interdepartmental Infectious Disease Work in Progress (weekly, year round) – Tuesday, 8:30 a.m., Marvin Graves Bldg., Room 4.208. Laboratories engaged in infectious disease research at UTMB present their current research in this relatively informal seminar setting designed to provide an interactive exchange of ideas. This series encourages the dissemination of research interest information encouraging the development of collaborative research efforts.

Immunology Research in Progress (once per month, year round) – Wednesday, 12 Noon, Levin Hall 3.320. Laboratories engaged in immunology and infectious diseases research at UTMB present their current research in this relatively informal seminar setting designed to provide an interactive exchange of ideas.This series encourages the dissemination of research interests and reagents and the development of collaborative research efforts.

Immunology Journal Club(three times per month, year round) – Wednesday, 12 Noon, MRB 4.145.Faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students present recently published papers in high-impact journals. These informal discussion sections allow fellows to strengthen their presentation skills and broaden immunological concepts and research tools.

Environmental Health and Medicine Seminar -The seminar series brings outstanding toxicologists to UTMB for lectures and informal interactions with faculty and trainees. This is typically held in Levin Hall room 3.320 at noon on Mondays in the Fall and Spring semesters.

Grand Rounds (PATH 6195) – (Weekly, Fall and Spring terms) - Monday, 12 Noon, GNL 1.100. This seminar series emphasizes topics of interest to those involved in the clinical activities of the Pathology Department. Faculty and invited guests from other UTMB departments and other educational institutions present current clinical research or other relevant clinical topics of interest.

Colloquium of Frontiers of Infectious Disease and Tropical Medicine (PATH 6145) (weekly, Fall and Spring terms) - Tuesday 12:00 p.m. 2.212 BSB. Local and visiting scientists are invited to present their most recent research in the fields of infectious disease, emerging infectious diseases, biodefense and tropical medicine.

The Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Disease Journal Club provides a forum for PhD students, postdoctoral fellows, faculty, and other interested staff to meet and discuss scientific papers of interest to the field. On a rotating basis, members of the club select papers for discussion and distribute them to the group in advance of the meeting. The topics are wide ranging and have included discussion of the secondary structure of HIV, the discovery of extant viral sequences in human and mammalian DNA, and the immunology of acute vs chronic viral infections. A discussion of the paper is led by the club member who selected the paper, with emphasis on critical evaluations of the experimental approach, methods, results, and interpretation of the data. Higher level discussions of the impact of the work described in the paper, its context vis-a-vis trends in infectious disease research and funding, and how similar approaches could be taken at UTMB are also encouraged. The journal club occurs on the second and fourth Wednesdays of every month at 4pm in GNL1.100.

Experimental Pathology Course Descriptions

PATH 6097 RESEARCH IN PATHOLOGY - 1-9 cr
This course varies in credit according to the work performed. The student concentrates on a problem of his or her own choosing with faculty advisor. Grading is S/U (satisfactory/unsatisfactory); Prerequisite: None; Terms offered: I,II,III; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: McBride
Top

PATH 6115 EXPERIMENTAL PATHOLOGY TRAINEE WORK IN PROGRESS - 1 cr
This course provides a forum for graduate student research in progress updates and is required for all graduate students in Experimental Pathology. The objective of this course is to enable students to gain experience by orally presenting their current research and future studies, and responding to questions from the audience. Attendance is required at the weekly Experimental Pathology seminars. Attendance at weekly Pathology Grand Rounds, other weekly clinical conferences, interdepartmental infectious disease conferences, and immunology or toxicology seminar offerings I voluntary, but strongly encourages. Grading is Standard (A-F) and grades will be determined based on submission of written evaluations (2nd year), attendance, and completion of one annual research presentation. (The written evaluations must be turned in to the Program Coordinator within 1 week of the seminar. Evaluations submitted after 1 week will automatically be reduced by one grade and those submitted 2 weeks late will not be accepted or receive a grade of F.) Attendance at 90% of seminars is required for year 2 trainees, and 80% for trainees in years 3-5. However, it is strongly recommended that graduate students attend all trainee seminar series, particularly those of their fellow students. Grades in the third year and beyond are based on attendance. Attendance records for the trainee workshop are maintained by the Program Coordinator. Prerequisites: Consent of program director; Hours per week: Conference 1; Terms offered: I, II; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: McBride
Top

PATH 6203 FUNDAMENTALS OF PATHOLOGY - 2 cr
The objective of this course is to introduce students to basic and functional histology of specific organ systems including cardiovascular, respiratory, genitourinary, gastrointestinal, hematopoetic and central nervous system through lecture and laboratory sessions. Areas of emphasis will be gross anatomy and embryology, functional histology, gross and microscopic pathology of infectious disease, toxicology and hemodynamic disorders, and animal models used in experimentation, including development, evaluation and validation. Experimental design and research techniques used in pathology will be emphasized and demonstrated in laboratory sessions, including histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, laser capture microdissection, laser confocal microscopy, electron microscopy, in vivo imaging and image analysis. Prerequisites: None; Grading is Standard (A-F); Term offered: III; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: Olano
Top

PATH 6145 COLLOQUIUM OF FRONTIERS OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES & TROPICAL MEDICINE - 1 cr
Frontiers in Infectious Diseases is an Experimental Pathology course that uses the Colloquium of Infectious Diseases and Immunity for its didactics. The colloquium is organized and sponsored by the Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases (CBEID), the Center for Tropical Diseases (CTD), and the Departments of Microbiology & Immunology (M&I) and Pathology at UTMB. This colloquium was created to offer faculty, staff, and trainees the opportunity to hear about the latest research of recognized experts in the fields of infectious diseases, microbiology, and immunity. Invited speakers are almost always from academic institutions throughout the United States and occasionally from international institutions. The Colloquium offers a wide range of topics within the fields of infectious diseases, microbiology, and immunity, including epidemiology, vaccine development, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, molecular biology, cellular microbiology, etc. Students registered for this course will have the opportunity to meet the speaker in a separate small-group session called "meet the professor". This is a great opportunity to learn not only about the details of the speaker's research, but also about their motivations in science, their life experiences, and their advice as it relates to professional and academic advancement. Grading is S/U (satisfactory or unsatisfactory) and depends on attendance. Specific requirements are the following: First year students will register for this course for the fall and spring semesters, and they must attend more than 80% of the seminars offered during those semesters; Second year students will register for this course for either the fall or the spring semester, and they must attend more than 80% of the seminars offered during the selected semester; Registered students must attend more than one third of the "meet the professor" post-seminar meetings. Terms offered: I,II; Year Offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: Valbuena
Top

PATH 6266 BASIC HUMAN PATHOBIOLOGY - 2 cr
The objective of this core course for the Experimental Pathology Program is to present the fundamentals and general mechanisms operating in human disease. This is achieved by presenting specific clinical examples, and elucidating the pathogenic mechanisms underlying these examples. Major topics could include inflammation, tissue repair and maintenance, neural injury, degeneration and repair, and developmental pathology. Grading is based on contributions to class discussion (40%) and a final examination (60%). Grading is Standard (A-F); Hours per week: Lecture 2, Conference 2; Term offered: II; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: Hawkins
Top

PATH 6276 BASIC HUMAN PATHOBIOLOGY – TOXICOLOGY - 2 cr
The objective of this course is to introduce the principles of toxicology. This is achieved by presenting specific clinically-relevant examples of toxic injury and exploring the biochemical, cellular and pathogenetic mechanisms that underlie these examples. Mechanisms of toxin-induced cellular injury discussed could include injury by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, xenobiotic adduction and metabolism, and receptor/signal disruption. Grading is based on contributions to class discussion (40%) and a final examination (60%). Grading is Standard (A-F); Hours per week: Lecture I, Conference I; Term offered: II; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinators: Boor/Khan
Top

PATH 6279 INTRODUCTION TO COMPETITIVE Grant Writing - 2 cr
This course will provide an introductory and interactive experience to competitive grant writing. Topics to be covered include understanding the review process, and planning, organizing, writing a successful hypothesis driven application. Students will be required to write a two year grant application, provide written critiques, and participate in a final mock study section review. Grading is Standard (A-F) and will be based on class participation (30%), written assignments (40%), and quality of the final application (40%). Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor, Term offered: I, Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinators: Rockx/Vasilakis
Top

PATH 6386 BASIC HUMAN PATHOBIOLOGY - INFECTIOUS DISEASE - 3 cr
The objective of this course is to introduce basic principles of infectious disease pathogenesis. This is achieved by introducing selected and representative pathogens and exploration of their virulence mechanisms from the biochemical, molecular and pathogenetic point of view. Presentation of clinically-relevant cases will illustrate these principles. This course is centered on the interaction of infectious organisms and their host rather than an "infectious agent"-centered course. Two general lectures on infectious disease pathogenesis and molecular diagnostics are followed by topics related to viral diseases, obligate intracellular bacteria, mycobacteria, gram positive and gram negative pathogens. The course is generously complemented by journal club sessions related to the topics presented at lectures. Grading is based on contributions to journal club discussion (30%) and a final examination (70%).Grading is Standard (A-F); Hours per week: Didactic lectures: 4 hours; Journal Club: 2 hours; Term offered: II; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: Olano
Top

BBSC 6217 PRINCIPLES OF LABORATORY BIOSAFETY - 2 cr
This course has been designed to include theoretical and practicum approach to biosafety for all students working in a laboratory. This course will focus on the BSL1-2 program with an introduction to BSL3. Topics will include risk assessment, personal protective equipment, proper use and selection of biological safety cabinets (BSCs) & chemical fume hoods, aerosol producing procedures, chemical safety, biological and chemical exposures, transport of biological materials, disinfection, waste handling and emergency laboratory procedures, regulatory requirements. Emphasis will be on development of competencies in fundamental laboratory techniques and using risk assessment to work safely and aseptically in the laboratory. This class will prepare students for future advancement opportunities into BSL 3 laboratories. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on organizing a biosafety cabinet (BSC) or fume hood, proper techniques in a BSC, preventing aerosols, transportation of biological material, disposing of wastes, and emergency procedures and decontamination. Grades will be based on attendance, participation, oral presentation and laboratory skills. Both classroom and laboratory components must be successfully completed to pass the course. Prerequisites: None; Hours per week: Laboratory 2; Lecture 1.5; Term offered: I; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: Brocard
Top

PROGRAM ELECTIVES

PATH 6000 SPECIAL TOPICS - 1-3 cr
Study of special topics in Experimental Pathology. Topics are selected and study programs arranged on an individual basis with staff member. Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor; Hours per week: Conference or discussion, 2; Terms offered: I,II,III; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: Staff
Top


PATH 6012 RESEARCH ROTATIONS - 1-6 cr
It is the goal of research rotations to provide exposure to the breadth of research opportunities in Experimental Pathology and to ensure that students receive diverse training. Rotation policies are flexible and responsive to students background and interest. The number and types of rotations are determined by the SEAC, which will take the student's experience and interests into consideration. Three rotations in combination of BBSC and Pathology Rotations are recommended for most students. Rotations within an area of interest should be representative of the different types of research within that area and ensure that students are exposed to diversity in approaches, thought and techniques. Students can request a waiver from the required rotations in writing to the SEAC, and the request must include justification for that waiver. The SEAC can grant such waivers based upon the justification and records submitted in support of such a waiver request supplied by the student. The purpose of this course is to provide introductory laboratory experiences that will help students choose their areas of specialization and assist in the selection of a supervisory professor for their subsequent dissertation research. A student works on an individual basis with a member of the faculty for all or part of a term (8 or 16 weeks), either independently performing a short project designed by the faculty member, or jointly working on some facet of ongoing research. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor; Hours per week: Conference 1; Lab, up to 20; Terms offered: I, II, III; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: McBride
Top

PATH 6098 THESIS - 1-9 cr
Formal research and writing leading to the preparation and completion of the thesis for the Master of Science degree under the direction of the student's supervisory committee. Grading is based on the student's level of performance as reported by the chairperson of the student's supervisory committee and is assigned as satisfactory, needs improvement, or unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the master's degree; Terms offered: I,II,III; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: McBride
Top


PATH 6099 DISSERTATION - 1-9 cr
Formal research and writing leading to the preparation and completion of the dissertation for the Doctor of Philosophy degree under the direction of the student's supervisory committee. Grading is based on the student's level of performance as reported by the chairperson of the student's supervisory committee and is assigned as satisfactory, needs improvement, or unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree: Terms offered: I,II,III; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: McBride
Top

PATH 6101 TEACHING SKILLS AND COURSE DEVELOPMENT I - 1 cr
Participation in Teaching Workshops: During these interactive sessions, students will learn about basic principles of course design, teaching strategies (especially small group teaching to foster active student learning and application), public speaking, and types of assessments (evaluations of student performance). In these workshop settings with their peers and the instructors, students will have an opportunity to explore their own ideas and attitudes about teachers and learners, discuss learning style preferences, investigate evidence-based best teaching practices, practice public speaking skills, and learn about selected computer-based educational technologies. Small group teaching in Integrated Medical Curriculum: Student teachers will apply principles of small group teaching in small group sessions for first year medical students in the Integrated Medical Curriculum. Each student will co-teach 4 laboratory exercises with a faculty instructor, on topics that include histopathology and pathobiology of inflammation, immunity, clinical and basic microbiology, neoplasia, and developmental/pediatric diseases. Students will receive feedback on their teaching effectiveness from the faculty instructor with whom they are paired. Students will have an opportunity to evaluate and critique lab exercises in terms of their effectiveness in fostering Significant Learning in students.
Grading is Standard (A-F) and will be based on participation in and preparation for teaching workshop sessions, oral presentation, and written assignments, and faculty evaluations of small group teaching in IMC labs. Prerequisites: PATH 6266, consent of instructor; Hours per week: 2; Term offered: II; Year offered: Biennial; Course Coordinator: Aronson
Top

PATH 6102 TEACHING SKILLS AND COURSE DEVELOPMENT II - 1 cr
Participation in Teaching Workshops: Students will receive focused, hands-on instruction in writing course objectives and multiple choice test items. Teaching a module in the Clinical Laboratory Sciences Program: Students will develop a module in a "Case-Studies" course for Clinical Laboratory Sciences Students in the School of Health Professions. Under the guidance of CLS instructors, student teachers will identify a topic or theme for consideration, develop objectives for the module, create lecture and case study material accordingly, and write MCQ style exam questions assessing CLS student acquisition/application of concepts addressed. This component will require that student teachers learn about clinical/diagnostic applications of basic science and demonstrate the ability to foster CLS student integration of laboratory data, basic science information, and clinical information. Student teachers will receive feedback about the effectiveness of their teaching from CLS students at the end of the module. Student teaching sessions will be video-recorded and reviewed by student and faculty mentor. Grading is Standard (A-F) and will be based on attendance and participation in teaching workshops, student and faculty evaluations of teaching effectiveness, and module development in CLS course [contribution to module planning; timeliness and appropriateness of objectives, lecture material, and test questions; and performance of test items]. Prerequisites: PATH 6101; Hours per week: 2; Term offered: III; Year offered: Biennial; Course Coordinator: Aronson
Top

PATH 6112 THE BIOLOGY OF ARTHROPOD DISEASE VECTORS - 1cr
The goal of this course is to introduce students to arthropods that are vectors for a wide variety of infectious agents that cause human diseases. The unique biology of hematophagous arthropods that has evolved to facilitate the coexistence between the vectors, pathogens, and the vertebrate host will be illustrated in both lectures and practical sessions. The curriculum will build upon a general introduction to arthropods. Then, using specific examples, the processes of infection, development, and transmission of pathogens will be discussed. This will include vector behaviors involved in location of the host, physiological adaptations to facilitate blood feeding and digestion, and factors that influence the vector-pathogen relationship. Options for controlling vector-borne diseases will be discussed from a historical perspective, with a consideration of how modern molecular approaches might be used in the future. Evaluations are based on full-term examination (80%) and laboratory practical (20%). Final examination: Students will be evaluated based on multiple-choice questionnaires, short essays and the demonstration of practical knowledge. Grading is Standard (A-F); Prerequisites: consent of instructor; Hours per week: 2; Term offered: III; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: Thangamani

Required reading: The Biology of Disease Vectors (Marquardt, W.C., Kondratieff, B., Moore. C.G., Freier, J., Hagedorn, H.H., Black, W. III., James, A.A., Hemingway, J. & Higgs, S. editors). Elsevier Academic Press. 2004.
Top

PATH 6123 CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY PRACTICUM - 1 cr
This course is designed to provide graduate students with an opportunity to gain both understanding and practical, hands-on experience in the policies, procedures and regulatory/safety standards of the clinical microbiology laboratory, and its role in infectious disease diagnostics. It serves as an introduction to the field of clinical microbiology, for those students interested in pursuing this area as a career choice. The student will rotate through different sections of the clinical microbiology laboratory. Bench-level rotations will expose the student to laboratory subspecialties including bacteriology, virology, serology, mycology, mycobacteriology and parasitology. The student will be given simulated specimens on which to perform bacterial identification and susceptibility testing under the guidance of microbiology technologists. Throughout the rotation, students will participate in weekly Microbiology Plate Rounds and are encouraged to attend the weekly Adult and Pediatric Infectious Disease Case Conferences. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor; Hours per week: Conference or discussion 2; Lab, up to 30; Grading is based on a written and oral assignment. Final grade will be assigned as either Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U); Terms offered I, II, III; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinators: Williams-Bouyer/ Loeffelholz
Top

PATH 6140 FOUNDATIONS OF VIROLOGY - 1 cr
Discoveries and discoverers, inventors and inventions, developers and technologies -- the historic bases for the state of virology research today and the larger context in which laboratory, field, and public health virology contribute to the prevention and control of viral diseases. I will use the tabular material and the 800 slide Powerpoint slide sets http://www.utmb.edu/ihii/virusimages/index.shtml to provide an overview of the history of medical virology, emphasizing as stated, "the discoverers and discoveries, the inventors and inventions, the developers and their technologies." In producing these materials I have accumulated quite a bit of information, enough to provide in lecture / discussion format a sense of the context of the discoveries, and in key instances lots of detail that everyone is sure to find exciting. 16 lectures will each cover an "era," starting with key events forming the base for the rise of microbiology in the 19th century, continuing with the discovery of the first viruses and the rise of the science in France, Germany and the United States in the early years of the 20th century, continuing with the discovery of most of the important human pathogens throughout the 20th century (and continuing today), and setting the stage for the molecular virology revolution that also continues. Grading is S/U (satisfactory/unsatisfactory). Pass/fail will be determined by attendance and participation in class discussions. Term offered: II; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: Murphy
Top

PATH 6161 INTRODUCTION TO VACCINOLOGY - 1 cr
Vaccines for the 21st Century is a five-week introductory course designed to provide the basic scientist with an understanding of vaccine development from conceptualization through development, testing and utilization. The course Objectives are to learn:

  1. The history of the development of vaccines and their impact on society.
  2. The identification of pathogens & diseases for which vaccines are needed.
  3. The principles of the development, availability and use of vaccines.
  4. The pathophysiologic approach to developing vaccine strategies.
  5. The application of traditional and new technologies to vaccine development.
  6. The importance of the regulatory process to vaccine development, including "proof of principle", preclinical and clinical testing.

The course will be taught in lecture format with a small number of expert lecturers. There will be assigned reading in preparation for each session. Reading materials will be provided. Each session will be 1 hour (total 15 contact hours). Course performance will be determined by take home midterm & final examinations (50% each). Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor; Term offered: I; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinators: Milligan/Reyes/Myers
Top

PATH 6195 – SEMINAR IN PATHOLOGY - 1 cr
This course requires attendance at, and participation in, weekly Pathology Grand Rounds, where the staff and guests from other departments and other educational institutions present current research or relevant topics of interest. Prerequisites: None; Hours per week: Seminar 1; Grading is S/U (satisfactory/unsatisfactory); Terms offered: l, ll, lll; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: McBride
Top

PATH 6211 Workshop in PHYLOGENETICS - 2 cr
Phylogenetic methods are becoming increasingly popular for studies of microbial systematics, molecular epidemiology and evolution, pathogen emergence, predicting host and vector relationships, inferring biochemical and drug sensitivity similarities, etc. Although user-friendly algorithms are now widely available, proper analyses require a theoretical understanding of the assumptions underlying the algorithms used, and the statistical methods for determining the stability of phylogenetic trees generated. This course is designed to provide students with a basic practical and theoretical knowledge of phylogenetic methods for analyzing nucleotide and amino acid sequences. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to make sound decisions on the best methods for analyzing their own sequences, run a variety of algorithms on a UNIX workstation and Macintosh personal computer, and interpret results to reach valid, statistically-supported conclusions.

The course will meet for one session of two hours each week. The first hour will be devoted to theoretical discussions of methods, and demonstrations using a laptop computer and projection system. The second hour will be a computer laboratory session where students will be given hands-on training with phylogenetic algorithms. Grading is S/U (satisfactory/unsatisfactory) and based on a class project involving phylogenetic analysis of the students' sequences (either their own sequences from a research project or GenBank sequences of interest) as well as completion of a mock research paper suitable for submission to a journal. The results of class projects will also be presented to the class in typical scientific meeting format. Requirements for a passing grade include both publication quality data and writing, and a presentation of quality suitable for a national meeting. The final grade will be based 75% on the written class project (mock research paper) and 25% on the oral class presentation. Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor; Hours per week: 2; Term offered: I; Year Offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: Forrester
Top

PATH 6242 CARDIOVASCULAR TOXICOLOGY - 2 cr
This course addresses the present state of knowledge concerning injury by exogenous chemicals to the heart and blood vessels. Examples of cardiac toxins will include those classified as (1) arrhythmogenic, (2) necrotizing and (3) contractile. Modes of toxin action and secondary phenomena are also discussed. With regard to the vascular system and myocardium, an initial review of the structural components of blood vessels will be made prior to addressing examples of toxins that induce (1) endothelial injury and (2) medial injury. A small-group teaching approach is used, including paper review and literature review, with assigned presentations by individual students. The basis for grading is discussion in class (30%) and written and oral presentations of assigned specific topics (70%). Pre-requisites: None; Term offered: II; Year offered: Biennial - Odd Years; Course Coordinator: Boor
Top

PATH 6289 CELLULAR MICROBIOLOGY AND DISEASE - 2 cr
This advanced course provides as in-depth examination of the molecular mechanisms of host-bacterial interactions to understand the bacterial strategies for evading or surviving the host defense systems. All topics are conceptual overviews of the principal mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis. Topics include molecular mechanisms of bacterial adherence to host cells and bacterial signaling host cells through adhesion molecules, bacterial subversion of endocytic pathways, bacterial manipulation of the host cell cytoskeleton, bacterial secretion systems, immune evasion mechanisms and persistent infection, and bacterial genomes and reductive evolution. Emphasis is given to diseases with prototypic pathogenic mechanisms. Instruction involves lectures, class discussions and readings in contemporary or classic literature. Grading is based on attendance (20%), class discussions and participation (30%), and one final examination (50%). The format of final exam will be for students to choose 5-6 out of 10-12 questions. Grading is Standard (A-F); Hours per week: Lecture 4, Conference 1; Term offered: II; Year offered: Biennial; Course Coordinator: Aguilar
Top

PATH 6310 PRINCIPLES OF Biodefense - 3 cr
This course provides an introduction to the principles underlying defense against bioterrorism, It also provides a basic description of the major biothreats, including microbiology, medical protection, epidemiology, and pathogenesis. Grading is Standard (A-F); Hours per week: Lecture 1, Conference 2; Term offered: I; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: Peters
Top

PATH 6318 TROPICAL DISEASES - 3 cr
This course is designed to provide graduate students with an overview of tropical diseases and related current research. The course is not designed to be comprehensive, but will sample representatives of major infectious tropical diseases. Emphasis is placed on the ecology, epidemiology and control of tropical diseases. The class meets two (2) times a week for 90 minutes; each session includes a 45 minute lecture by a faculty member, followed by the presentation of a pertinent paper and discussion questions. Students are expected to submit their selected reference and at least 5 discussion questions to the lecturer one week in advance. Grading is Standard (A-F); Prerequisites: Consent of instructor; Hours per week: Lecture 3; Term offered: II; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: Melby/Travi
Top

CELL 6307 ADVANCED CELL BIOLOGY - 3 cr
The objective of this course is to instruct students in advanced concepts and techniques in cell biology. The development of critical thinking skills will be emphasized. Students will be graded on two exams, a midterm (25%) and a comprehensive final examination (25%). The remaining 50% of the score will be based upon presentation of relevant research papers by the students. The final exam will cover both the first (20%) and second (80%) halves. Examinations will use short-answer format. Instructors are requested to generate two short-answer problems for each week. Each week will begin with an introductory lecture by the instructor on Monday. The class on Wednesday will be devoted to techniques in the relevant discipline, and this may be formal classroom discussion or a direct demonstration in a research laboratory. According to the feedback from the last class, students are very engaged by in-lab method classes. Instructors are strongly encouraged to use this format when possible. The class on Friday will be presentation by a student of a relevant paper in the discipline being discussed that week. Each class will be one hour. Term offered: III; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinator: Tang
Top

MICRO 6315 PATHOGENIC BACTERIOLOGY - 3 cr
The objective of this course is to introduce students to concepts of research on bacterial pathogens. Pathogens infecting man will be studied, with emphasis given to their pathogenic mechanisms, induction of immunity, and physiochemical characteristics. The course will consist of lectures and discussions. Grading based on written examinations. Prerequisites: BBSC First Year Curriculum; Hours per week: Lecture 2; Conference or discussion 1; Term offered: III; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinators: Eaves-Pyles, Endsley
Top

MICRO 6403 GENERAL VIROLOGY - 4 cr
Principles and concepts of animal virology will be presented, but the majority of the course will be devoted to the study of viruses of medical importance. Emphasis will be placed upon the chemical and physical characteristics of viruses, viral interaction with the immune system, pathogenesis of viral infections, and the mechanisms of replication of viruses. The course consists of lectures and discussion periods. Grades will be based on performance on written examinations. Prerequisites: BBSC First Year Curriculum; Hours per week: Lecture 3; Conference 1; Term offered: I; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinators: Nichols/Bente
Top

MICRO 6408 ADVANCED IMMUNOLOGY - 4 cr
An in-depth study of the immune response and related events with emphasis on the mechanism of cellular and humoral immunity. Some of the topics to be covered include antibody structure and function, antigen-antibody reactions, cells involved in the immune response, antibody formation, cellular immunity, mediators, tolerance, and immunogenetics. Material will be presented in lectures and assigned readings of texts, reviews, and research articles. Grading will be based on written examinations and class participation. Prerequisites: BBSC First Year Curriculum; Hours per week: Lecture 3; Conference or discussion 1;Term offered: II; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinators: Soong/Milligan
Top

BBSC 6210 FUNDAMENTALS OF INFLAMMATION - 2 cr
This seven-week course deals with fundamental concepts pertaining to inflammation. Inflammation plays a necessary role in wound healing and tissue surveillance, but can also lead to chronic wounds and pathologic states such as inflammatory bowel disease. By moving fluids and white blood cells from the blood into extravascular tissues the host can eliminate abnormal cells, foreign particles, microorganisms, etc. and initiate repair processes. Topics include inflammatory cells, the role that pathogens (bacterial, viral and parasitic) play in inflammation, the mediators (lipids, cytokines, peptides, and other molecules) and cellular events involved in cell recruitment and movement through the vessel wall into tissue spaces. Common inflammatory processes and wound healing will be discussed. Grades will be determined by performance in the discussion of current literature and on one take-home short-essay exam. Prerequisites: BBSC 6401, BBSC 6402, BBSC 6403 or consent of instructor; Hours per week: Lecture 3; Conference/Discussion 1; Term offered: III; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinators: Hawkins/Midori-Horiuti/Reyes
Top

BBSC 6219 VACCINE DEVELOPMENT PATHWAY - 2 cr
This eight-week introductory course will be taught in lecture format with a small number of expert lecturers. The course is designed to provide the basic scientist with an understanding of vaccine development from conceptualization through development, testing, and utilization. This multidisciplinary course was designed to introduce students to all of the aspects of vaccine development and utilization to include aspects of vaccines for infectious diseases and chronic non-infectious diseases (e.g., cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and addiction). Grades will be based on performance of two examinations and class attendance. Prerequisites: BBSC 6401, BBSC 6402, BBSC 6403, or consent of instructor; Hours per week: Lecture 2, Conference/Discussion 2; Term offered: III; Year offered: Annually; Course Coordinators: Barrett/Milligan
Top

POLICY REGARDING LABORATORY ROTATIONS
In an effort to track the progress and performance of our students throughout their tenure at UTMB, we request that a specific research plan be outlined by the students and the faculty members in whose laboratory they would like to rotate. This plan for the rotation should be agreed upon and outlined on the form provided and submitted at the Pathology Education Office by the second week of the rotation period. At the completion of the rotation, the student will be asked to provide a report as to the results of their rotation. The faculty will be asked to provide a written evaluation of the student within two weeks after the end of the rotation period. These reports and evaluations will become part of the student's permanent file, enabling us to better evaluate and grade our students for each rotation period. It is essential that we generate complete and detailed records of student performance in all phases of the program. Your assistance in these efforts would be greatly appreciated.

Jere W. McBride, Ph.D.

Jere W. McBride, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Pathology
Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases
Sealy Center for Vaccine Development
Director, Experimental Pathology Graduate Program

Office: (409) 747-2498
Fax: (409) 747-2455
jemcbrid@utmb.edu