Alexander Bukreyev, Ph.D.

Alexander Bukreyev, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Pathology;
Member, Galveston National Laboratory;
Member, Western Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research;
Member, UTMB Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases;
Senior Scientist, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development;
Member, UTMB Institute for Human Infections and Immunity

University of Texas Medical Branch
301 University Boulevard
JSA 2.148
Galveston, TX 77555-0609

Office: (409) 772-8554
abukreye@utmb.edu

«Back

Alexander Bukreyev, Ph.D.

Professional Education

Degree Institution Field of Study Graduation Year
MS Pyatigorsk Pharmaceutical Institute, Pyatigorsk, Russia. Pharmacy 1984
PhD State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology "Vector", Koltsovo, Russia. Molecular Biology 1993

Honors

2014 Member of the Organizing Committee of the 6th International Symposium on Filoviruses, Galveston, Texas, March 30-April 2, 2014.
2013 Convener of the Viral Epidemiology Workshop, 32th Annual Meeting of American Society for Virology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania. July 20-24, 2013.
2012

Convener of the Emerging Viruses Workshop, 31th Annual Meeting of American Society for Virology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. July 21-25, 2012.

Member of the Filoviridae Study Group of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, 2012-present.
2011

Member of Global Viral Network, 2011-present.

Convener of the Filoviruses Workshop, 30th Annual Meeting of American Society for Virology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. July 16, 2011.

American Society for Virology Program Planning Committee, 2011-2013.
2010 Convener of the Filoviruses Workshop, 29th Annual Meeting of American Society for Virology, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana. July 17, 2010.
2009 Convener of the Vaccine and Viral Vectors III Workshop, 28th Annual Meeting of American Society for Virology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. July 14, 2009.
2009 (two awards); 2008 (two awards); 2007; 2006 National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Performance Award in Recognition of Special Achievement in Support of the Mission of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
2005 The National Institutes of Health Merit Award in Recognition of Outstanding Contributions and Efforts in Support of NIAID Mission.
2005; 2004; 2003; 2002; 2001 National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Staff Recognition Awards in Recognition and Appreciation of Special Achievement.
2000 The National Institute of Health Fellows Award for Research Excellence. 2000 (competitive).
1999 Special Act of Service Award, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Recognition and Appreciation of Special Achievement.
1996 - 1994 Personal Russian State Scholarship for Young Outstanding Scientists. 1994-1996. Awarded by the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences. 1994.

Professional Affiliations

1996-Present American Society for Virology, Full Member

Research Interests

Our group focuses on development of vaccines, antibody treatments and small molecule treatments against filoviruses Ebola and Marburg and on investigation of the mechanisms of their high pathogenicity. Our research includes the following specific topics:

  • Characterization of antibody responses to filovirus infections in humans, in collaboration with Dr. James Crowe, Jr. (Vanderbilt University).
  • Development of therapeutic human monoclonal antibody treatments for filoviruses, in collaboration with Dr. James Crowe, Jr. (Vanderbilt University).
  • Development of mucosal respiratory tract vaccines against filoviruses based on human and non-human paramyxovirus vectors.
  • Investigation of mechanisms of "immune paralysis" caused by filoviruses.
  • Development of therapeutics targeting filoviral replication and interferon-antagonist functions (in collaboration with Dr. Sergei Nekhai and Dr. Chris Basler).
  • Comparative immunology of bats as a reservoir of filoviruses (in collaboration with Dr. Chris Basler).
  • Genome sequencing of emerging viral pathogens, including paramyxoviruses and filoviruses.

To get insight into these scietific topics, we are using molecular tools, including reverse genetics (i.e. development of genetically modified filoviruses from the DNA-copies of their genomes and use of mini-genomes), immunological tools such as multi-parameter flow cytometry, and human immune cells and animal models. Our research includes experiments in a BSL-2 lab and in BSL-4 labs of the Galveston National Laboratory.

Our research is supported by multiple sources, including R01 and multiple U19 grants from NIH, and grants from DTRA (DoD) and the Department of Homeland Security.

Our collaborators include Dr. James Crowe, Jr. (Vanderbilt University), Dr. Chris Basler (Mount Sinai), Dr. Sergei Nekhai (Howard University), Dr. Thomas Geisbert (UTMB), Dr. Siba Samal (University of Maryland), Dr. Scott Weaver (UTMB), Dr. Raul Andino (UCSF), and Dr. Werner Braun (UTMB).

Selected Publications

ARTICLES IN PEER-REVIEWED JOURNALS:

    1. A. Bukreyev, E. Camargo, and P. Collins. Recovery of infectious respiratory syncytial virus expressing an additional, foreign gene (1996). J. Virol. 70:6634-6641.
    2. B. Beer, R. Kurth, and A. Bukreyev (1999). Characteristics of Filoviridae: Marburg and Ebola Viruses. Review article. Natur Wissenschaften 86:8-17.
    3. A. Bukreyev, S. S. Whitehead, N. Bukreyeva, B. R. Murphy, and P. L. Collins (1999). Interferon gamma expressed by a recombinant respiratory syncytial virus attenuates virus replication and yet maintains immunogenicity in mice. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96:2367-2372.
    4. A. Bukreyev, B. R. Murphy, and P. L. Collins (2000). Respiratory syncytial virus can tolerate an tntergenic sequence of at least 160 nucleotides with little effect on transcription or replication in vitro and in vivo. J. Virol. 74:11017-11026.
    5. A. Bukreyev, I. M. Belyakov, J. A. Berzofsky, B. R. Murphy and P. L. Collins (2001). Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor expressed by recombinant respiratory syncytial virus attenuates viral replication and increases the level of pulmonary antigen-presenting cells. J. Virol. 75:12128-12140.
    6. A. Bukreyev and I. Belyakov (2002). Expression of immunomodulating molecules by recombinant viruses: Can the immunogenicity of live virus vaccines be improved? Review article. Expert Rev. Vaccines 1(2):233-245.
    7. A. Bukreyev, M. H. Skiadopoulos, J. McAuliffe, B. R. Murphy, P. L. Collins and A. C. Schmid (2002). More antibody with less antigen: Can immunogenicity of attenuated live virus vaccines be improved? Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99:16987-16991. The article was chosen for PNAS press release on 12/09/02.
    8. A. Kotelkin, E. A. Prikhod'ko, J. I. Cohen, P. L. Collins and A. Bukreyev (2003). Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Sensitizes Cells to Apoptosis Mediated by Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL). J. Virol. 77:9156-9172.
    9. A. Bukreyev, E. W. Lamirande, U. J. Buchholz, L. N. Vogel, W. R. Elkins, M. St. Clair, B. R. Murphy, K. Subbarao, and P. L. Collins (2004). Mucosal immunization protects monkeys against SARS coronavirus infection. Lancet. 363(9427):2122-2127. The article was chosen for Lancet press release on 06/23/04 and the NIH press release on 06/24/04.
    10. A. Bukreyev, I. M. Belyakov, G. A. Prince, K. C. Yim, K. K. Harris, J. A. Berzofsky, and P. L. Collins (2005). Expression of interleukin-4 by recombinant respiratory syncytial virus is associated with accelerated inflammation and a non-functional cytotoxic T lymphocyte response following primary infection but not following challenge with wild-type virus. J. Virol. 79:9515-9526. The article was chosen for J. Virol. spotlight.
    11. A. Bukreyev, L. Yang, S. R. Zaki, W-J. Shieh, P. E. Rollin, B. R. Murphy, P. L. Collins, and A. Sanchez (2006). A single intranasal inoculation with a paramyxovirus-vectored vaccine protects guinea pigs against a lethal dose Ebola virus challenge. J. Virol. 80:2267-2279.
    12. A. Bukreyev, M. E. Serra, F. R. Laham, S. R. Kleeberger, P. L. Collins, and F. P. Polack (2006). The cysteine-rich region and secreted form of the attachment G glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus enhance the cytotoxic T lymphocyte response despite lacking MHC class I-restricted epitopes. J. Virol. 80:5854-5861. The article was chosen for J. Virol. spotlight.
    13. A. Kotelkin, I. M. Belyakov, L. Yang, J. A. Berzofsky, P. L. Collins, and A. Bukreyev (2006). The NS2 protein of human respiratory syncytial virus suppresses the cytotoxic T cell response as a consequence of suppressing the type I interferon response. J. Virol 80:5958-5967.
    14. A. Bukreyev, M. H. Skiadopoulos, B. R. Murphy, and P. L. Collins. (2006). Paramyxoviruses as vaccine vectors. Review. J. Virol. 80:10293-10306.
    15. A. Bukreyev, P. E. Rollin, M. Tate, L. Yang, S. R. Zaki, W.-J. Shieh, B. R. Murphy, P. L. Collins, and A. Sanchez (2007). Intranasal vaccination with a paramyxovirus-vectored vaccine protect primates against challenge with Ebola virus. J. Virol. 81:6379-6388.
    16. J. DiNapoli, A. Kotelkin, L. Yang, B. R. Murphy, S. Samal, P. L. Collins, and A. Bukreyev (2007). Intranasal immunization of primates with Newcastle disease virus expressing the severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) spike glycoprotein (S) elicits protection against SARS-CoV challenge. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 104(23):9788-9793.
    17. J. M. DiNapoli, L. Yang, A. Suguitan Jr., S. Elankumaran, B. R. Murphy, S. K. Samal, P. L. Collins, and A. Bukreyev (2007). Immunization of primates with a Newcastle disease virus-vectored vaccine via the respiratory tract induces high titer serum neutralizing antibodies against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. J. Virol. 81(21):11560-11568. The article was chosen for American Society for Microbiology press release in November 2007.
    18. S. Munir, C. Luongo, C. Le Nouen, U. J. Buchholz, P. L. Collins, and A. Bukreyev (2008). Non-structural proteins 1 and 2 of respiratory syncytial virus suppress maturation of human dendritic cells. J. Virol. 82 (17):8780-8796.
    19. A. Bukreyev, L. Yang, J. Fricke, L. Cheng, J. M. Ward, B. R. Murphy, and P. L. Collins (2008). The secreted form of the G glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus helps the virus evade antibody-mediated restriction of replication by acting as an antigen decoy and through effects of Fc receptor-bearing leucocytes. J. Virol. 82 (24):12191-12204.
    20. J. DiNapoli, B. Nayak, L. Yang, B. W. Finneyfrock, A. Cook, H. Anderson, F. Torres-Velez, B. Murphy, S. Samal, P. Collins, and A. Bukreyev (2010). Newcastle disease virus-vectored vaccines expressing the hemagglutinin or neuraminidase protein of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus protect against virus challenge in monkeys. J. Virol. 84 (3):1489-1503.
    21. S. Munir, P. Hillyer, C. Le Nouen, U. J. Buchholz, R. Rabin, P. Collins, and A. Bukreyev (2011). Respiratory syncytial virus interferon antagonist NS1 protein suppresses and skews the T lymphocyte response. PLoS Pathogens 7(4):e1001336.
    22. N. M. Lubaki, P. Ilinykh, C. Pietzsch, B. Tigabu, A. N. Freiberg, R. A. Koup, and A. Bukreyev (2013). The lack of maturation of Ebola virus-infected dendritic cells results from the cooperative effect of at least two viral domains. J. Virol. 87(13):7471-7485.
    23. P. A. Ilinykh, B. Tigabu, A. Ivanov, T. Ammosova, Y. Obukhov, T. Garron, N. Kumari, D. Kovalskyy, M. O. Platonov, V. S. Naumchik, A. N. Freiberg, S. Nekhai, and A. Bukreyev (2014). Role of Protein Phosphatase 1 in Dephosphorylation of Ebola Virus VP30 and its Targeting for the Inhibition of Viral Transcription. J Biol. Chem. JBC/2014/575050 in press.

NIH Biosketch