Natalie Williams-Bouyer, Ph.D.

Natalie Williams-Bouyer, Ph.D.

Assistant Director, Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Pathology;
Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology

University of Texas Medical Branch
5.177 John Sealy Annex
301 University Boulevard
Galveston, TX 77555-0740


Office: (409) 747-0603
Fax: (409) 772-5683
nmwillia@utmb.edu

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Natalie Williams-Bouyer, Ph.D.

Appointments

2007-Present Assistant Director Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
2005-Present Assistant Professor Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
2005-2009 Director Clinical Laboratory Services, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Galveston, Texas
2004-2005 Assistant Bureau Chief Clinical Services Section, Bureau of Laboratory Services, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
2001-2004 Research Associate/
Laboratory Manager
Houston Tuberculosis Initiative, Department of Pathology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
1999-2001 Clinical Instructor Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
1999-1999 Acting Director Parasitology , Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
1999-1999 Course Laboratory Assistant Pathobiology and Host Defense Laboratory, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
1998-1999 Microbiology Lab Contact CDC National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System- Intensive-Care Antimicrobial Resistance Epidemiology (ICARE), University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
1997-1998 Study Coordinator Swab Equivalency Study for the Collection of Female Endocervical Specimens (Gen-Probe Inc.), University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
1992-1993 Medical Microbiology Laboratory Instructor Department of Microbiology, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tennessee
1990-1997 Graduate Research Assistant Department of Microbiology, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tennessee

Professional Education

Degree Institution Field of Study Graduation Year
B.S. University of Southwest Louisiana, Lafayette, LA Microbiology 1989
Ph.D. Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN Microbiology 1997
Post-Doctoral Fellow University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX Clin/Public Health Microbiology 1999

Honors

1998 American Society for Microbiology Student Travel Award
1997 Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges
1995-1997 National Science Foundation Research Center of Excellence of Meharry Medical College (MRCE) Fellowship
1995 Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges
1994 American Society for Microbiology Supplemental Fellowship
1993 American Society for Microbiology Student Travel Award
1992-1995 Patricia Roberts Harris Fellowship
1990-1992 Minority Biomedical Research Support (MBRS) Program Fellowship

Professional Affiliations

2008-Present Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America
2006-2008 American Burn Association
2006-2008 International Society for Burn Injuries
2005-Present Clinical Laboratory Management Association
2005-Present Association of Public Health Laboratories
1995-1997 American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
1990-1997 Sigma Delta Epsilon/Graduate Women in Science
1988-Present American Society for Microbiology

Research Interests

Antimicrobial resistance trends. Antimicrobial resistance trends have been a long standing interest of mine. I am particularly interested in the origins of microorganisms that acquire multiple antibiotic resistance. Individuals infected with drug-resistant organisms are more likely to have longer hospital stays and require treatment with second- or third-generation drugs that may be more toxic, and/or more expensive. Therefore, the intent of my research is to utilize molecular techniques to study the epidemiology of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO), as a means of prevention and control of infections caused by these microbes. Ideally, these methods will lead to an improved efficacy in the characterization of antimicrobial resistant organisms isolated in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

Selected Publications

  1. Williams-Bouyer NM and McGinnis Hill E. Involvement of host cell tyrosine phosphorylation in the invasion of HEp-2 cells by Bartonella bacilliformis. FEMS Microbiology Letters 171:191-201, 1999.
  2. Williams-Bouyer N, Reisner BS, Woodmansee CE, Falk PS and Mayhall CG. Comparison of the Vitek GPS-TB card to disk diffusion testing for predicting the susceptibility of enterococci to vancomycin. Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 123:622-625, 1999.
  3. Williams-Bouyer N, Hernandez A and Reisner BS. Predicting the susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae to ceftriaxone and cefotaxime by cefuroxime and ceftizoxime disk diffusion testing. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 37:3707-3710, 1999.
  4. Williams-Bouyer N, Reisner BS and Woods GL. Comparison of Gen-Probe AccuProbe group B streptococcus culture identification test with conventional culture for the detection of group B streptococci in broth cultures of vaginal-anorectal specimens from pregnant women. Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease 36:159-162, 2000.
  5. Williams-Bouyer N, Yorke R, Lee HI and Woods GL. Comparison of the MGIT 960 and ESP Culture System II for growth and detection of mycobacteria. Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 38: 4167-4170, 2000.
  6. Woods GL, Bergmann JS, and Williams-Bouyer N. Clinical evaluation of the Gen-Probe Amplified Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Direct Test for rapid detection of M. tuberculosis in select nonrespiratory specimens. Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 39: 747-749, 2001.
  7. El Sahly HM, Septimus E, Soini H, Septimus J, Wallace RJ, Xi P, Williams-Bouyer N, Musser JM, and Graviss EA. Mycobacterium simiae Pseudo-Outbreak Resulting from Contaminated Hospital Water Supply in Houston, Texas. Clinical Infectious Diseases. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 35: 802-807, 2002.
  8. Woods GL, Williams-Bouyer N, Wallace RJ, Brown-Elliott BA, Witebsky FG, Conville,PS, Plaunt M, Hall G, Aralar P and Inderlied C. Multisite Reproducibility of Results Obtained by Two Broth Dilution Methods for Susceptibility Testing of Mycobacterium avium Complex. Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 41: 627-631, 2003.
  9. El Sahly HM, Wright JA, Soini H, Bui TT, Williams-Bouyer N, Escalante P, Musser JM and Graviss EA. Recurrent Tuberculosis in Houston, Texas- A Population-Based Study. International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. 8: 333-340, 2004.
  10. Conger NG, O’Connell R, Laurel V, Olivier K, Graviss EA, Williams-Bouyer N,
    Zhang Y and Wallace RJ Jr. Mycobacterium simiae Pseudo-outbreak Associated with a Hospital Water Supply. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. 25: 1050-1055, 2004.
  11. Zhang Y, Yarkus MA, Graviss EA, Williams-Bouyer N, Turenne C, Kabani A and Wallace RJ Jr. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) study of Mycobacterium abscessus isolates previously affected by DNA degradation. Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 42: 5582-5587, 2004.
  12. Biçmen C, Esen N, Graviss EA, Williams-Bouyer N, Ramaswamy SV, and Yulug N. Molecular characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Izmir, Turkey. New Microbiology. 30 (3): 229-40, 2007.
  13. Franco DM, Aronson JF, Hawkins HK, Gallagher JJ, Mendoza L, and McGinnis MR and Williams-Bouyer N. Systemic Pythium insidiosum in a pediatric burn patient. In press in Burns 2009.

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