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SCI Cafe

SCI Cafe

About SCI Cafe

SCI Café:  Since 2013, SCI Cafés have been conducted on an ongoing basis, enabling UTMB scientists to engage in casual dialogs with community members regarding translational science. Topics were originally identified by a community survey that revealed common areas of interest, including but not limited to environmental estrogens, environmental exposures related to flooding and storm surge, infectious diseases, diet and nutrition, obesity, diabetes, aging, women’s health, and ethical issues.  We have partnered with four venues to host the sessions to date.  While we had initially intended to utilize only one venue at a local coffeehouse, we expanded to other sites at the behest of community groups.  For example, a not-for-profit organization that serves numerous African-American faith-based organizations in the Galveston area specifically requested a series on African-American participation in research, and another series on chronic health issues and related research that were held in alternate more proximal locations to facilitate attendance.  A GISD series has been developed SCI Cafe Logorelated to engaging children interested in a career in science and their families.  We have completed 28 SCI Cafés, including the following topics related to environmental health: 1) Translational Research: SCI Cafe LogoIncreasing Communication between UTMB Scientists and the Community; 2) Pilot Teen SCI Cafés: Feeding the Scientific Pipeline; 3) Environmental Estrogens; 4) Disaster Research Response, 5) Asthma and the Environment, 6) Second-Hand Smoke and Bronchiolitis; 7) Estrogenic Effects of Chemical Additives in Food; 8) Pesticides; 9) Ebola and Chikungunya; and 10) Zika.  

After two years, our program has evolved to better suit the needs of our communities.  One not-for-profit, faith-based group has become so adept at the process that they are now carrying out SCI Café events independently, although we remain committed to supporting their needs by providing expertise or assistance as requested.  At one of the venues, a local library, it was determined that the constituents in attendance preferred a lecture series.  This demonstrated the need to adapt messaging to meet the wants of the various community groups.  We currently actively engage our two most relevant audiences, i.e., the general public and teens interested in a career in science.  The COEC will expand SCI Café topically to reflect the current and emerging research areas within the CET, e.g., asthma; BPA, other potential endocrine disrupters and environmental exposures of concern impacting health; as well as the interaction between environmental exposures, immunological responses, and health outcomes.  SCI Cafés are hosted by COEC staff and scientists involved in the CET’s research projects, resulting in a direct translation of research to the community, while providing the opportunity for our scientists and trainees to increase their competency to convey the nature and importance of their work for the public. Most importantly, this enables the COEC to increase environmental health literacy in our community.  We recently developed a new SCI Café survey and evaluation tool that captures audience demographic information, a self-evaluation on participants’ learning, understanding and interest, and what prompted their attendance.  For updates on upcoming SCI Cafe like us on Facebook. 

About SCI Cafe

SCI Café:  Since 2013, SCI Cafés have been conducted on an ongoing basis, enabling UTMB scientists to engage in casual dialogs with community members regarding translational science. Topics were originally identified by a community survey that revealed common areas of interest, including but not limited to environmental estrogens, environmental exposures related to flooding and storm surge, infectious diseases, diet and nutrition, obesity, diabetes, aging, women’s health, and ethical issues.  We have partnered with four venues to host the sessions to date.  While we had initially intended to utilize only one venue at a local coffeehouse, we expanded to other sites at the behest of community groups.  For example, a not-for-profit organization that serves numerous African-American faith-based organizations in the Galveston area specifically requested a series on African-American participation in research, and another series on chronic health issues and related research that were held in alternate more proximal locations to facilitate attendance.  A GISD series has been developed related to engaging children interested in a career in science and their families.  We have completed 28 SCI Cafés, including the following topics related to environmental health: 1) Translational Research: SCI Cafe LogoIncreasing Communication between UTMB Scientists and the Community; 2) Pilot Teen SCI Cafés: Feeding the Scientific Pipeline; 3) Environmental Estrogens; 4) Disaster Research Response, 5) Asthma and the Environment, 6) Second-Hand Smoke and Bronchiolitis; 7) Estrogenic Effects of Chemical Additives in Food; 8) Pesticides; 9) Ebola and Chikungunya; and 10) Zika.  

After two years, our program has evolved to better suit the needs of our communities.  One not-for-profit, faith-based group has become so adept at the process that they are now carrying out SCI Café events independently, although we remain committed to supporting their needs by providing expertise or assistance as requested.  At one of the venues, a local library, it was determined that the constituents in attendance preferred a lecture series.  This demonstrated the need to adapt messaging to meet the wants of the various community groups.  We currently actively engage our two most relevant audiences, i.e., the general public and teens interested in a career in science.  The COEC will expand SCI Café topically to reflect the current and emerging research areas within the CET, e.g., asthma; BPA, other potential endocrine disrupters and environmental exposures of concern impacting health; as well as the interaction between environmental exposures, immunological responses, and health outcomes.  SCI Cafés are hosted by COEC staff and scientists involved in the CET’s research projects, resulting in a direct translation of research to the community, while providing the opportunity for our scientists and trainees to increase their competency to convey the nature and importance of their work for the public. Most importantly, this enables the COEC to increase environmental health literacy in our community.  We recently developed a new SCI Café survey and evaluation tool that captures audience demographic information, a self-evaluation on participants’ learning, understanding and interest, and what prompted their attendance.

About SCI Cafe

SCI Café:  Since 2013, SCI Cafés have been conducted on an ongoing basis, enabling UTMB scientists to engage in casual dialogs with community members regarding translational science. Topics were originally identified by a community survey that revealed common areas of interest, including but not limited to environmental estrogens, environmental exposures related to flooding and storm surge, infectious diseases, diet and nutrition, obesity, diabetes, aging, women’s health, and ethical issues.  We have partnered with four venues to host the sessions to date.  While we had initially intended to utilize only one venue at a local coffeehouse, we expanded to other sites at the behest of community groups.  For example, a not-for-profit organization that serves numerous African-American faith-based organizations in the Galveston area specifically requested a series on African-American participation in research, and another series on chronic health issues and related research that were held in alternate more proximal locations to facilitate attendance.  A GISD series has been developed related to engaging children interested in a career in science and their families.  We have completed 28 SCI Cafés, including the following topics related to environmental health: 1) Translational Research: SCI Cafe LogoIncreasing Communication between UTMB Scientists and the Community; 2) Pilot Teen SCI Cafés: Feeding the Scientific Pipeline; 3) Environmental Estrogens; 4) Disaster Research Response, 5) Asthma and the Environment, 6) Second-Hand Smoke and Bronchiolitis; 7) Estrogenic Effects of Chemical Additives in Food; 8) Pesticides; 9) Ebola and Chikungunya; and 10) Zika.  

After two years, our program has evolved to better suit the needs of our communities.  One not-for-profit, faith-based group has become so adept at the process that they are now carrying out SCI Café events independently, although we remain committed to supporting their needs by providing expertise or assistance as requested.  At one of the venues, a local library, it was determined that the constituents in attendance preferred a lecture series.  This demonstrated the need to adapt messaging to meet the wants of the various community groups.  We currently actively engage our two most relevant audiences, i.e., the general public and teens interested in a career in science.  The COEC will expand SCI Café topically to reflect the current and emerging research areas within the CET, e.g., asthma; BPA, other potential endocrine disrupters and environmental exposures of concern impacting health; as well as the interaction between environmental exposures, immunological responses, and health outcomes.  SCI Cafés are hosted by COEC staff and scientists involved in the CET’s research projects, resulting in a direct translation of research to the community, while providing the opportunity for our scientists and trainees to increase their competency to convey the nature and importance of their work for the public. Most importantly, this enables the COEC to increase environmental health literacy in our community.  We recently developed a new SCI Café survey and evaluation tool that captures audience demographic information, a self-evaluation on participants’ learning, understanding and interest, and what prompted their attendance.


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Past Flyers and Handouts

SCI Cafe

  • From Air Quality to Zoning: Healthy Community Indicators - March 30, 2017
  • Can Meditation Have Long-Term Health Benefits? - Feb 2, 2016
  • Is it really just all in my head? Balancing a mental health condition and daily life. - Dec 1, 2016
  • Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease: The Race is On - Oct 27, 2016
  • Big Data (Big Brother) and the Future of Privacy: Benefit or Threat? - Sept 29, 2016
  • Burn Injuries - May 26, 2016
  • Zika Virus: Facts & Updates - April 28, 2016
  • Teen Cafe: Scrub typhus: a neglected tropical disease - April 6, 2016
  • Teen SCI Cafe; Bench Students Research Review - April 29, 2016
  • Brain Injury: From Concussion to Coma - March 24, 2016
  • Protecting Muscle Health: Nutrition & Exercise Strategies - Feb 25, 2016
  • Brain-Gut connections: Unruly Bowels from Inflammation and Stress - Nov 19, 2015
  • Consumer Product Chemicals that Impersonate Hormones – Yikes!! - Oct 15, 2015
  • Respiratory infections new ideas for treatment and prevention. What did we learn from RSV? - Sept 24, 2015
  • Teen SCI Cafe: Bench Students Research Review - May 8, 2015
  • Pesticides & Impacts on Human Cognition - May 7, 2015
  • Vaccination in the 21st Century: Victim of its own Success? - April 23, 2015
  • Teen SCI Cafe; Investigating Chikungunya - March 11, 2015
  • Growing a Human Lung: A Transnational Science Journey - Nov 13, 2014
  • Chikungunya, Ebola & Ongoing Outbreaks - Oct 16, 2014
  • Cocaine Addiction, Vaccine Development & Treatment - Sept 11, 2014
  • Diabetes & Its Impact - July 12, 2014
  • Environmental Health in a Disaster: Lesson from the Gulf Coast - June 5, 2014
  • Teen SCI Cafe: Bench Students Research Review - May 1, 2014
  • West Nile Virus - April 24, 2014
  • BPA: Not Out of the Woods. Meet BPS - March 22, 2014
  • Stress Management through Exercise - Feb.19, 2014
  • Obesity: Health, Treatment & Discovery - Feb. 8, 2014
  • Diet & Eating Healthily: How to shop, meal planning, label reading & healthy snacking - Jan 2, 2014
  • Health Research for AA: Beyond Tuskegee - Nov 2, 2013
  • Diabetes - Oct 15, 2013