Visiting Scholar Announcements

Wendell Taylor, PhD, MPHTaylor, Wendell

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Wendell Taylor, PhD, MPH as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Taylor will be in residence from March 2020 through July 2020. The objectives of his current research proposal are to present a comprehensive overview and analysis of ethics related to hiring practices and workplace interventions for people who smoke or are obese. His research interests are physical activity, workplace health promotion, health equity, and health behaviors in high priority populations.

Dr. Taylor was the principal investigator of a National Institutes of Health grant titled, Booster Breaks: A 21st Century Innovation to Improve Worker Health and Productivity. This study was a cluster-randomized controlled trial of health promoting breaks in the workplace and assessed physical, psychological, and organizational-level outcomes. There are more than 16 peer-reviewed publications related to the Booster Break concept and interventions.

Dr. Taylor received his AB from Grinnell College, MS in Psychology from Eastern Washington University, PhD in Social Psychology from Arizona State University, and his MPH from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health. In addition, he completed a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in Community Health at the Center for Health Promotion Research and Development, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. His previous positions include tenured Associate Professor of Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health, and Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research as well as Adjunct Associate Professor in the Cizik School of Nursing, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

 

Minji Lee, PhDMinji Lee

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Minji Lee, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Lee will be in residence from June 2019 through August 2020. Dr. Minji Lee recently received a PhD Degree in the Department of Religion at Rice University. Her PhD thesis, “Bodies of Medieval Women as Dangerous, Liminal, and Holy: Representations in the Writings of Late Medieval Religious Women” explored how this medieval German nun defended the woman’s sexual/reproductive body” as positive in the images of re-creation and salvation against misogynic medieval and religious culture of her age.

Granted that Dr. Lee is a medievalist interested in the interactions between mysticism and medicine in the Middle Ages, she now turns to the new research project to compare medieval European medical theories and modern Korean folk medicine in order to see how women have been striving to maintain their reproductive health and to bring positive meanings to their own bodies. She also participated in making a Korean independent documentary project “For Vagina’s Sake (2017)” to posit how Western pre-modern medicine “diabolized” women’s menstrual body.

Currently, she is also a volunteer at Reunion Institute to promote public awareness in religion.

 

Upreet Dhaliwal, MSUPREET DHALIWAL

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Upreet Dhaliwal, MS as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Dhaliwal will be in residence from February 2019 through May 2019.

Dr. Upreet Dhaliwal, formerly Director-Professor of Ophthalmology at the University College of Medical Sciences, University of Delhi, is one of the founding members of the Medical Humanities Group in the Institution.

She is editor of the journal “Research and Humanities in Medical Education (RHiME)” which is an online-only, peer-reviewed, open-access journal, the only journal in Asia that caters specifically to the medical humanities. RHiME can be accessed at www.rhime.in/ojs

An occasional poet, and an avid promoter of medical student-led poetry sessions, Dr Dhaliwal is keen to deepen her involvement with the humanities through the visiting scholar program at the Institute for Medical Humanities. Her work here involves an exploration of the Provider-Patient relationship through the medium of poetry.

 

Leslie Griffin, Ma, MPhil, PhD, JDLeslie C. Griffin, MA, MPhil, PhD, JD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Dr. Griffin as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Griffin will be in residence from August 2018 through April 2019.

Dr. Griffin is the William S. Boyd Professor of Law at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law. Dr. Griffin teaches constitutional law and is known for her interdisciplinary work in law and religion.

She holds a PhD in Religious Studies from Yale University and a JD from Stanford Law School. She is author of the Foundation Press casebooks, Law and Religion: Cases and Materials (4th edition, 2017) and Practicing Bioethics Law (2015), which was co-authored with Joan H. Krause, Dan K. Moore Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of North Carolina School of Law.

 

M. Murat Civaner, PhD, MD M. Murat Civaner, PhD, MD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome M. Murat Civaner, PhD, MD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Civaner will be in residence from July 2018 through August 2018.

Dr. Civaner is a 1992 graduate of the Uludag University School of Medicine. He earned a PhD in ‘Public Health’ from Dokuz Eylul University in 1999 and a PhD in ‘Medical Ethics and History of Medicine’ from Ankara University in 2006. 

Dr. Civaner is currently a professor of Medical Ethics and History of Medicine at Uludag University School of Medicine in Bursa, Turkey. His professional duties include teaching, ethics consultation, and research. He teaches medical ethics and history of medicine to undergraduate medical students, as well as master's and PhD candidates. He also teaches research ethics to future researchers. 

Dr. Civaner is a member of the Patient Rights Committee of Uludag University Centre for Health, Practice and Research, which handles patient complaints weekly. He also works in the Hospital Ethics Committee, established for case review, guideline development, and training physicians.

In 2017 Dr. Civaner was awarded the Hans-Joachim Schwager - Prize for Clinical Ethics in recognition of his efforts to develop a clinical ethics consultation service and a Hospital Ethics Committee at Uludag University Centre for Health, Practice and Research.

 

Matthis Krischel, PhD Matthis Krischel, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is please to welcome Matthis Krischel, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Krischel will be in residence from March 2018 through June 2018.

Dr. Krischel earned a Master of Arts in the history of science from the University of Oklahoma in 2007 and a doctorate in history and the philosophy of medicine from Ulm University in Germany in 2013.

Dr. Krischel's research focuses on the history of medicine and the life sciences in the 19th and 20th century. He has published articles on the history of Nazi medicine and its commemoration, the history of eugenics and human genetics, the history of urology and narrative bioethics.

As a Visiting Scholar, Dr. Krischel will study the history and reception of hypothermia experiments performed at Dachau Nazi concentration camp in 1942/1943. He is especially interested in determining if, while clearly unethical, these experiments were performed to internationally recognized scientific standards of the time.

 

Diane B. Paul, PhD Diane B. Paul, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Diane B. Paul, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Paul will be in residence from January 2018 through March 2018.

Diane B. Paul is Professor Emerita at the University of Massachusetts Boston and Research Associate in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University. Since 2004, when she retired from UMass Boston, she has held visiting teaching appointments at the Center for Society and Genetics at UCLA and the Department of Medical History and Bioethics at the University of Wisconsin – Madison and research appointments at the University of British Columbia, the Harvard Medical School Program in Ethics and Health, the Vrige University Medical Center in Amsterdam, the Science and Innovation Unit at the University of Edinburgh, and the Zoology Department at the University of Otago in Dunedin, NZ.

Dr. Paul's research has primarily focused on the histories of evolution and genetics, especially in relation to eugenics and the nature-nurture debate. She has also published policy-oriented work on controversies over cousin marriage and on contemporary prenatal and neonatal genetic testing. Her books include Controlling Human Heredity: 1865 to the Present (Humanities/Random House, 1995), The Politics of Heredity: Essays on Eugenics, Biomedicine, and the Nature-Nurture Debate (SUNY Press, 1998), The PKU Paradox: A Short History of a Genetic Disease (with Jeffrey P. Brosco, MD; Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013), and, most recently, Eugenics at the Edges of Empire: New Zealand, Australia, Canada and South Africa (co-edited by John Stenhouse and Hamish G. Spencer; Palgrave Macmillan, 2017).

During her residency as a Visiting Scholar, Dr. Paul hopes to make progress on her major current project: “The Quest for Objectivity in Prenatal Genetic Care: Conundrums of the ‘Pro-Information’ Movement.”

 

William Ventres, MD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome William Ventres, MD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Ventres will be in residence from February 2017 through May 2017.

 

Jonathan Vanderhoek, PhD Jonathan Vanderhoek, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Jonathan Vanderhoek, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Vanderhoek will be in residence from September 2016 through November 2016.

Dr. Vanderhoek earned a doctorate in philosophy from the University of Texas at Austin.

Dr. Vanderhoek is an Instructor of Philosophy and Biomedical Ethics at Selkirk College. his areas of specialization include normative ethics, moral psychology, and clinical ethics.

As a Visiting Scholar, Dr. Vanderhoek will be working on a project that explores the relationship between empathy and moral agency in the clinical context. He will focus on three topics in particular: 1) how empathy can help providers to understand their patients’ evaluative and emotional attitudes in response to delivered prognoses, 2) how empathy influences providers motivational sets, and 3) how implicit biases impact the reliability of empathy as resource for understanding patients. In addition to this research, he will spend time working with and learning from the Clinical Ethics team.

 

Fionagh Thomson, PhD Fionagh Thomson, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Fionagh Thomson, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Thomson will be in residence from June 1, 2016 through November 30, 2016.

Dr. Thomson is an ethnographer with an interest in how to create the space and time with participants to think through and describe their everyday lives: focusing on what people do rather than what they think they do. She works with video, camera, paper and conversation. She likes to work across, rather than within, disciplines and outside academia with medical professionals, lab scientists, design engineers and artists. 

Dr. Thomson's current research explores the conflict within the blood supply chain (donation to transfusion)—between ensuring a sufficient and a safe supply of blood components, at a time when donor numbers are dropping and blood manufacturing regulations are tightening. Her other interests include different representations of the ‘body’ in medical spaces (e.g. MRIs), the extension of health professionals’ senses through tools/technologies and philosophical hermeneutics (Gadamer, Ricoeur & Idhe). 

Dr. Thomson earned a Master of Science from the University of Edinburgh, a Master of Philosophy from the University of Cambridge, and a Doctorate from the University College London Institute of Education. Her background includes environmental ethics, visual anthropology, philosophy, human geography and ecology. Dr. Thomson has completed fieldwork in the rainforests of Papua New Guinea, the islands of the Scottish Hebrides and the consulting spaces of emergency departments, breast cancer outpatients, GP clinics and patients’ homes.

 

Browne Lewis, MPA, JD, LLM Browne C. Lewis, MPA, JD, LLM

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Browne C. Lewis, MPA, JD, LLM as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Lewis will be in residence from September 1, 2015 through October 31, 2015.

 

 

 

 

Vanessa L. Johnson, MBA, JD, LLM Vanessa L. Johnson, MBA, JD, LLM

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Vanessa L. Johnson, MBA, JD, LLM as a isiting Scholar. Dr. Johnson will be in residence from August 20, 2015 through September 20, 2015.

Dr. Johnson is an Assistant Professor of Legal Studies at the University of Houston - Clear Lake School of Business.

Dr. Johnson earned a Master of Laws in Health Law, a Master of Laws in Tax Law, and Juris Doctorate from the University of Houston Law Center. She also earned a Master of Business Administration from the New York University Stern School of Business, and a Bachelor of Science in Management from the Tulane University Freeman School of Business.

Dr. Johnson is an alumna of Leadership Houston's Class XXIX, as well as the United Way of Greater Houston's Project Blueprint Class XXIX. She has served on the boards of directors for Builders of Hope CDC, Avenue CDC, and the Fifth Ward Enrichment Program.

 

Anna Magdalena Fisher, MA, PhD Anna Magdalena Elsner, MA, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Anna Magdalena Elsner, MA, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Elsner will be in residence from February 10, 2015 through July 31, 2015.

Dr. Elsner earned a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy and French from the University of Oxford, and a Master of Arts in European Literature and Culture and a Doctorate from the University of Cambridge. She completed a fellowship with the Joanna Randall McIver Research Fellowship Program at St Hugh’s College, Oxford.

Dr. Elsner is a Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow at the Department of French and the Centre for the Humanities and Health based at King’s College London. Her areas of research include twentieth-century French literature and philosophy, the intersections between literature and medicine, theories of melancholy, psychoanalysis and cinema.

Dr. Elsner has a forthcoming book on mourning and creativity in Proust, Freud and Derrida, and has written a variety of articles on À la recherche du temps perdu and documentary cinema. She is a member of the Équipe Proust at the ITEM, based at the ENS, Paris.

In her current research project, Dr. Elsner is investigating the clinical encounter in twentieth-century French literature and film, paying particular attention to questions arising from doctor-patient communication relating to pain.

While in residence at the Institute, Dr. Elsner will work on a chapter about physician writers in twentieth-century France, focusing on the importance some of these writers attribute to the processing and re-shaping of the clinical encounter in their non-clinical writing.

 

Dien Ho, MA, PhD Dien Ho, MA, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Dien Ho, MA, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Ho will be in residence from February 2, 2015 through March 31, 2015.

Dr. Ho is an associate professor of philosophy and healthcare ethics at MCPHS University in Boston, Massachusetts. His area of research includes reproductive ethics, organ transplantation policies, philosophy of science, and philosophy of pharmaceutics.

Dr. Ho is the author of numerous articles in both academic journals (Bioethics, AMA Journal of Ethics, and Analysis) and popular media (Newsweek and Philosophy NOW) and is currently editing an anthology on philosophy and pharmaceutics. The volume explores philosophical issues from the development of drugs to their dispensing and to their usages.

Dr. Ho earned a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy and politics from Brandeis University, a Master of Arts in philosophy from Tufts University, and a Doctorate in philosophy from the Graduate Center—the City University of New York.

Prior to joining MCPHS University, he taught at University of Kentucky, Brooklyn College, and Yale University.

In addition to his research and teaching, Dr. Ho also serves as a clinical ethics consultant for Boston-area's hospitals. He was a founding member of the University of Kentucky Medical Center's Ethics Committee. Besides his passion for philosophy, he is also an avid cyclist and an aficionado of zombies.

 

 

Terence Wright, PhD Terence Wright, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Terence Wright, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Wright will be in residence from February 1, 2015 through April 30, 2015.

 Dr. Wright is Emeritus Professor of Visual Arts at Ulster University (UU), Northern Ireland and Chair of the Anthropological Association of Ireland. Formerly he was Course Director for the MFA Photography program at UU.

Dr. Wright is a Fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute, board member of the Society for Visual Anthropology and affiliated member/visiting researcher at DIGIS (Digital Studio for Research in Design, Visualisation & Communication), Department of Architecture, University of Cambridge.

Dr. Wright earned Master’s degree in Fine Art from Chelsea School of Art, London; a Master’s in Ethnology, University of Oxford and a Doctorate from University College London (1986) for his work on photography and visual perception.

He worked as a freelance photographer for BBC News and Current Affairs, programs such as That’s Life, Rough Justice and Crimewatch, as well as editorial photography for Cosmopolitan, Company and New Scientist.  Among his assignments for the BBC he covered the Libyan People’s Bureau siege in London and the Iranian Airline hijack in Paris in 1984. 

In 1998 Dr. Wright returned to Oxford University to establish the research project  ‘Moving Images – The Media Representation of Refugees’ at the university’s Refugee Studies Centre. He was also a Visiting Professor at Kunsthøgskolen i Bergen (Bergen Academy of Art) in Norway. 

As part of the European Union funded ‘NM2’ (New Millennium, New Media) research project, Dr. Wright produced and directed The Interactive Village (2004-7): a digital ethnography of Dolní Roveň a village in Eastern Bohemia, Czech Republic in collaboration with the University of Pardubice. He also produced a FUSION cross-border creative & digital media economic development project forming part of the Northern Ireland Peace Process. The project developed interactive mobile media guides to Irish history sites with the overall aim of enabling visitors to access multi-perspective, contested or contradictory histories as well as myth, legend and conjecture.

In 2008 Dr. Wright held a Visiting Research Fellowship at CRASSH (Centre for Arts, Social Sciences & Humanities) at the University of Cambridge. He has exhibited his visual work in UK, Poland and Russia; his publications translated into Polish, Spanish, Russian and Chinese. In 2014 Dr. Wright was co-organiser of the Future of the Visual Image in the Medical Humanities conference held at the Open Gates Centre at UTMB. His current research project “The Memory Game” is a visual media iPad-based system for reminiscing, supporting memories of people with dementia.

During his residence in the Institute, Dr. Wright will be working in this area of study as well as conducting further research into the theoretical dimensions of visualization, memory and reminiscing.

Books:

The Photography Handbook (3rd edition). London: Taylor & Francis, in press. 

Visual Impact: culture and the meaning of Images. Oxford: Berg, 2008

Publications include:

“Drawn from Memory: reminiscing, narrative and the visual image” International Journal of Computers in Healthcare, 2010

“Photography and Visual Rhetoric” in The SAGE Handbook of Visual Research Methods. London: Sage, 2011
“Visual Culture, Ethnography and Interactive Media” in A Companion to the Anthropology of Europe. Oxford: Blackwell,

2012
“Media, Refugees and other Forced Migrants” in The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies. Oxford University Press, 2014

 

Valerie Gray Hardcastle, MA, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Valerie Gray Hardcastle, MA, PhD.  Dr. Valerie Gray Hardcastle, MA, PhDHardcastle will be in residence from January 6, 2015 through February 28, 2015.

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Valerie Gray Hardcastle, MA, PhD. Dr. Hardcastle will be in residence from January 6, 2015 through February 28, 2015.

Dr. Hardcastle is a Professor of Philosophy, Psychology, and Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience at the University of Cincinnati. She is also a Scholar-in-Residence at the Weaver Institute for Law and Psychiatry, as well as an Acting Director of the Medicine, Health, and Society Program at the University of Cincinnati.

Dr. Hardcastle is an internationally recognized scholar and the author of five books and over 130 essays. She studies the nature and structure of interdisciplinary theories in the mind and brain sciences and has focused primarily on developing a philosophical framework for understanding conscious phenomena (especially that of pain) responsive to neuroscientific, psychiatric, and psychological data.

Dr. Hardcastle is currently investigating the neuroscience of violence and its implications for both our understanding of human nature and the criminal justice system.  Dr. Hardcastle earned a Bachelor of Arts in both philosophy and political science from the University of California at Berkeley, a Master of Arts in philosophy from the University of Houston, and an interdisciplinary Doctorate in cognitive science and philosophy from the University of California, San Diego.

 

Reverand Vasileios Thermos, MD, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome the Reverand Vasileios Thermos, MD, PhD Reverand Vasileios Thermos, MD, PhDas a Visiting Scholar. He will be in residence from July 15, 2014 through October 15, 2014.

Rev. Dr. Thermos was born in 1957 at Lefkada, Greece. He studied at the Medical School of Athens University and after he graduated he studied at the Theological School of the same university.

Rev. Dr. Thermos specialized in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry which he still practices in Athens, Greece. In 1996-97 he was a Visiting Scholar at Harvard Divinity School; he took classes also in Harvard School of Arts and Humanities, Boston College, Boston University, Andover Newton Theological School.

In 1997, Rev. Dr. Thermos earned a Doctorate in Pastoral Psychology from the Theological School of Athens University. In 1986 he was ordained a priest of the Orthodox Church of Greece. He has been engaged into training programs for clergy in Greece, Cyprus, and the USA. 

Rev. Dr. Thermos has written numerous books and articles in Greek; some of them have been translated into English, French, Russian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Spanish. He is the editor of a new journal in Greek (Psyches dromoi: Ways of the Soul), published every 6 months, on the relationships between theology/religion and psychiatry/psychology (first issue in May 2011).

In 2004, a master thesis on his total work appeared by Peter Kazaku at the Theological School of Balamand University, Lebanon. This thesis was updated and enriched, thus forming the book Orthodoxy and Psychoanalysis: Dirge or Polychronion to the Centuries-old Tradition? which was published in 2013 by Peter Lang publications in the series ‘European University Studies’, volume 938. 

Rev. Dr. Thermos was a Visiting Professor of Pastoral Psychology and Psychology of Religion in the Theological Academy of the Orthodox Church of Albania from 2001 to 2013. In 2013 he joined the University Ecclesiastical Academia of Athens as an Assistant Professor of Pastoral Theology and Pastoral Psychology. 

He has been a member of scientific committees organizing conferences on the relationship between theology and psychiatry/psychology. He has also given thousands of lectures to seminars, parents groups, clergy assemblies, camps, high schools, radio and TV etc. His areas of interest are: the relationship between psychological sciences and religion; the psychology of religious beliefs and experiences; the dialogue between psychoanalysis and religion; the psychology of clergy and of the ecclesiastical organization; the psychology of culture; religious development of children and adolescents; language, psychology, and religion; an post-modernity and religion.

Rev. Dr. Thermos is now working on a book about a theological elaboration of homosexuality. While in residence at the Institute he will complete part of it under the title “Same-Sex Attractions and Greek Patristic Thought: Towards an Ontology of Love”. It aspires to bridge a psychiatric-psychological issue of high importance in our public forefront with the ontological-theological dimension found in some rather unknown byzantine sources. The problematic of gender lies in the middle of this discussion.

 

 

Jac Saorsa, MPhil, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Jac Saorsa, MPhil, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Jac Saorsa, MPhil, PhDDr. Saorsa will be in residence from May 3, 2014 through June 3, 2014.

Dr. Saorsa earned a Master of Philosophy from Glasgow University and a Doctorate in Philosophy and Contemporary Drawing Practice from Loughborough University. She also studied drawing and sculpture at the New York Academy of Art Graduate School.

Dr. Saorsa  is a visual artist, writer and researcher in art practice and philosophy. She gave drawing workshops in the New York Metropolitan Museum. Jac is a fellow of the British Higher Education Academy and has extensive experience of teaching drawing practice and theory in Universities in Costa Rica, Cyprus, Lisbon, London, and Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has presented and exhibited her work both nationally in the UK, and internationally.

As an Honorary Research Fellow with Cardiff and Vale Health Board, Jac has collaborative links with Cardiff and Swansea Universities, and with Imperial College London where she has delivered drawing workshops attended by both medical faculty and students. 

Based in Cardiff, UK, Jac’s practice as a whole is deeply embedded in the field of Medical Humanities and she is particularly interested in the role and impact of visual art within the field. Her research interests are centered in an ongoing inquiry into how we, as human beings, engage with our world, with particular regard to the relation between art practice and biomedical science as it affects the existential ‘lived experience’ of illness.

In 2013, Jac founded The Broadway Drawing School in Cardiff, UK, and later set up The Broadway Atelier which offers drawing, sculpture and anatomy classes based on artist training in the classical tradition.

Dr. Saorsa's current research projects include Drawing Women’s Cancer, an ongoing collaborative project working with gynecological surgeons and women patients, and Medicine Unmasked, an Artist in Residency project (October 1014- February 2015) involving her shadowing medical students at Swansea medical School as they carry out a clinical apprenticeship in oncology. 

Recent publications include chapters in Intensities and Lines of FlightDeleuze/Guattari and the Arts, (2014), Calcagno, A., Vernon, J. S.Lofts (Eds.) Rowman and Littlefield, Deleuze and the Schizoanalysis of Visual Art (2014) Buchanan, I., L. Collins (Eds.) Bloomsbury Academic, and her own book, Narrating the Catastrophe: An Artist’s Dialogue with Deleuze and Ricoeur (2011) Intellect Books.

Jac’s work can be found online at:

Drawing Women’s Cancer http://drawingcancer.wordpress.com
Dis-Figuration http://jacsaorsa.wordpress.com
Durham University Centre for Medical Humanities

This is Dr. Saorsa's second visit to UTMB Health as Visiting Scholar at the institute. During this residence, Jac will continue her work on a monograph for the Drawing Women’s Cancer project, and visit the UTMB Department of Anatomy.

 

 

Eric Weissman, MA, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Eric Weissman, MA, PhD as a Visiting Eric Weissman, MA, PhDScholar. Dr. Weissman will be in residence from February 1, 2014 through September 30, 2014.

Dr. Weissman  is a filmmaker, writer, artist and educator. He earned a Master of Arts in Sociology at the University of Toronto in 1986. Between 1987 and 2009, Dr. Weissman was successful as an artist and scenic painter, working on feature films, museum installations and various private and public commissions.  At the same time, he worked as a researcher for Exile, a literary quarterly in Ontario Canada and as a documentary filmmaker amongst homeless groups in Toronto.  The theme of his documentary work is that housing and housing policy cannot be thought of as separate from ethical issues inherent to systems of healthcare.  In fact, housing is requisite for healthcare, and, homelessness is, therefore, a concern for academic and practical inquiries into community health.

Dr. Weissman's film series, Subtext – real stories follows the rise and fall of Toronto’s illegal and infamous shantytown, Tent City between 2000-2002, and then follows a group of ex-residents as they navigated transitions into mainstream housing. He was awarded the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) Filmmaker Assistance Program Grant, and the Ontario Arts Council, Emerging Video Artist Grant in 2004. Subtext was featured at the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) as the video component for an exhibition on street art and poverty called Housepaint Phase II, which ran between 2008-2009. This work continues, 13 years later and became the basis for his recent dissertation research.

In 2013 Dr. Weissman earned a Doctorate in The Special Individualized Programs at Concordia University in Montreal.  His dissertation, Spaces, Places and States of Mind: a pragmatic ethnography of liminal critique explores intentional homeless communities by focusing on Dignity Village, Oregon, the first city contracted emergency homeless community in US history where he did participant observation in 2010 and 2011. His dissertation incorporates debates about the use of public space on the basis of perceptions of “worth,” exploring how massive displacements of citizens from economic roles create more tolerant moral and political discourses on spatial occupations by poor people.  It also addresses the question of what it means to be an activist citizen within the context of constitutional democracies.  He problematizes what freedom means when winning the right to self-govern in unhealthy and poverty-stricken tent camps and shantytowns is seen as an expression of constitutional rights.  At a theoretical level, he addresses the classic post-structural conundrum of how to reinvest critique with the power to influence social change. In his research, the liminal aspects of classic critical positions provide a positive opening to transformative thinking.  Finally, the dissertation asks public ethnographers and applied social science to think about the ethical implications of doing visually supported research in communities of struggle, especially by addressing the risks of producing critical knowledge about communities, knowledge that can be divisive just as it might be liberating. 

Dr. Weissman's dissertation was granted “outstanding” status, and was recommended for the thesis award.  A version of this research appears in his book, Dignity in Exile, tales of struggle and hope from a modern American shantytown (2012).  It is towards understanding how bioethical and often implicit understandings of healthcare expressed as the stories we tell ourselves and each other about rights to space and care, deserving-undeserving categories of poverty and ethical treatment of the other, that his research now looks. Importantly, image systems such as, photos, fine art and film figure prominently in his research because of the evidential weight we tend to give things we can see.

Dr. Weissman's main research interest while in residence at UTMB Health is to initiate and publish the results of field inquiries in which members of various communities will be asked to look at and comment on their emotional and ethical attachments to images of poverty and homelessness.  Working with scholars at UTMB and the University of Houston, Dr. Weissman will investigate how an online visual mapping tool called VWIRE, can be used to integrate, even unite practitioners, service workers, policy makers, homeless folks and various others by revealing how the stories we use to understand poverty and health issues, despite our diverse socio-economic or mental health histories (including addiction) link us along continua of other common experience.  Just how other is the Other?  Currently in the US, close to 146 million people must choose between food, clothing, rent and healthcare each month.  Of these, only 47 million are considered by federal policy makers to live below the poverty line.  Dr. Weissman's research will reveal how traditional narrative divides about deserving and undeserving poor are collapsing into a general awareness about citizenship as a continuum of democratic experience. The fact that residents of tent camps, shantytowns and other forms of poverty activism, understand themselves to be fighting for their constitutional rights, suggest that at a profound and basic level, all citizens are united around certain basic ethical premises that are often lost in the stories we tell.

 

 

Jac Saorsa, MPhil, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Jac Saorsa, MPhil, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Jac Saorsa, MPhil, PhD

Dr. Saorsa will be in residence from October 1, 2013 through November 30, 2013.

Dr. Saorsa is a visual artist, writer, and researcher in art practice and philosophy. She works primarily on the interface between visual art practice and the medical humanities.

Dr. Saorsa's research interests are centered on an ongoing inquiry into how we, as human beings, engage with our world, with particular regard to the relation between art practice and biomedical science as it affects the existential "lived experience" of illness.

Dr. Saorsa earned a Master of Philosophy from Glasgow University, and a PhD in Philosophy and Contemporary Drawing Practice from Loughborough University. She has extensive experience of teaching drawing practice and theory in Universities in Costa Rica, Cyprus, Lisbon, London, and most recently at Cardiff Metropolitan University, School of Art and Design, and has presented her work both nationally and internationally.

As an Honorary Research Fellow with Cardiff and Vale Health Board, Dr. Saorsa has collaborative links with Cardiff and Swansea Universities, and with Imperial College London where she has delivered drawing workshops attended by both medical faculty and students.   She currently runs The Broadway Drawing School in Cardiff, UK.Recent publications include her book, Narrating the Catastrophe: An Artist’s Dialogue with Deleuze and Ricoeur (2011) Intellect Books, and her work can be found online at:

http://drawingcancer.wordpress.com

http://jacsaorsa.wordpress.com/

 

Kristy Williams, PhD, LLB, LLM

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Kristy Williams, PhD, LLB, LLM as a Visiting Kristy Williams, PhD, LLB, LLMScholar. Dr. Williams will be in residence from September 1, 2013 through May 31, 2014.

Dr. Williams earned a Bachelor of Science in molecular biology and biochemistry from Simon Fraser University. During her undergraduate studies she participated in a cooperative education program and had the opportunity to spend a year working full time for two biotechnology companies. Dr. Williams earned a Doctorate in neuroscience from Memorial University of Newfoundland, researching the molecular and cellular biology involved in nerve regeneration.

Dr. Williams also earned a Bachelor of Law from the University of Calgary. During law school Kristy approached health law issues from an interdisciplinary perspective, and presented her legal research on discrimination on the basis of genetic information, in Canada, at a national conference.  She then clerked for the Alberta Court of Queen’s Bench and completed her articles with a law firm.  Dr. Williams earned a Master of Laws in health law from the University of Houston, where she completed her thesis on the creation of a regulated market for human cadaver organs, focusing on how such a market would promote organ donation and recognize the imp the need to compensate the estates of cadaver organ donors for the donation. She also researched how FDA regulations governing updates to medical device software impacts both the device manufactures and users ability to respond to cybersecurity threats to medical devices.

Dr. Williams is a member of the Law Society of Alberta and the New York Bar.

Dr. Williams research at the Institute will involve the legal and ethical issues surrounding physician-patient conflict over the withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment.   Her interest in the intersections of law and medicine stems from her diverse academic background in both the sciences and the law. 


Donna A. Patterson, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Donna A. Patterson, PhD as a Visiting Donna A. Patterson, PhDScholar. Dr. Patterson will be in residence from June 15, 2013 through August 31, 2013.

Dr. Patterson is an Assistant Professor in Africana Studies at Wellesley College in Wellesley, Massachusetts. She has published on women pharmacists in Senegal, illegal pharmaceutical trafficking, and public health in Africa in the Journal of Women's History, Harvard Africa Policy Journal , and the Journal of Healthcare for the Poor and Underserved. Her book on the emergence and expansion of medical professionals, particularly pharmacists, in French West Africa and postcolonial Senegal is forthcoming. She has begun a new book project that considers transnational linkages to drug trafficking and control in sub-Saharan Africa. 

Dr. Patterson has provided cultural and trade expertise to corporations, NGOs, and government agencies while working and living in Washington, DC and West Africa. While working at the Dakar Embassy, she advised businesses and foreign governments on trade, public relations and humanitarian concerns and reported on women's economic activity in rural and urban Senegal. She also helped to coordinate the U.S. Secretary of Transportation's Open Skies Summit in Senegal.

Dr. Patterson earned a Doctorate in African history and studies from Indiana University at Bloomington. She has received fellowships from Fulbright IIE, Woodrow Wilson Center, Princeton University, and the American Historical Association.

 

Browne C. Lewis, MPA, JD, LLM

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Browne C. Lewis, MPA, JD, LLM as a Visiting Browne C. Lewis, MPA, JD, LLMScholar. Dr. Lewis will be in residence from April 23, 2013 through June 23, 2013.

Dr. Lewis is the Leon & Gloria Plevin Professor of Law and the Director of the Center for Health Law & Policy at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law.

Dr. Lewis earned a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Grambling State University. She completed fellowships at Carnegie-Mellon University, the University of Minnesota Humphrey Institute, and the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government. Dr. Lewis earned a Doctorate of Jurisprudence from the University of Minnesota, a Masters of Public Policy from the University of Minnesota Humphrey Institute, and a Master of Laws from the University of Houston.

Dr. Lewis started her professional career as a statistician and ADR trainer at the Conflict and Change Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Then, she clerked for the Honorable Daniel Wozniak, Chief Judge of the Minnesota Court of Appeals. Dr. Lewis practiced in the areas of environmental, elder, family, housing and probate law. In the summer of 2012, she was a visiting researcher at the Fondation Brocher in Geneva, Switzerland. In the summer of 2013, Dr. Lewis will be a visiting Scholar at the Hasting Center and at Yale University's Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics.  

Dr. Lewis writes in the areas of bioethics, family and reproductive law. She has published in the George Mason Law Review, the Cardozo Law Review and the Lewis & Clark Law Review. Her most recent article on physician-facilitated suicide was published in the Oregon Law Review.   In July 2012, New York University Press published Dr. Lewis' book entitled Papa's Baby: Paternity and Artificial Insemination.

Heidi Powell-Mullins, MEd, EdD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Dr. Heidi Powell-Mullins as a Visiting Heidi Powell Mullins, MEd, EdDScholar. Dr. Powell-Mullins will be in residence from January 1, 2013 through December 31, 2013.

Dr. Powell-Mullins earned a Doctorate of Education in art education from the University of Houston.

Dr. Powell-Mullins has served as an Assistant Professor of Art Education at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and Eastern Washington University. In 2011 she served as a delegate to Cuba with the National Art Education Association focusing on global arts education initiatives; she was an invited scholar to the Atelier-Schaumbad in Austria (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jq199DNXIiE ); and in 2010 she served as an National Endowment for the Humanities fellow in Alaska (UAS) and British Columbia (UBC). In 2009 Dr. Powell-Mullins served as a Fulbright Scholar at the Iceland Academy for the Arts-Listahaskoli Islands lecturing and pursuing creative research in interdisciplinary approaches to arts education. 

Dr. Powell-Mullins exhibits nationally and internationally and has exhibited work at the Atelier Schaumbad and remix: galerie in Graz, Austria, The Lost Horse Gallery in Reykjavik, Iceland, Salon Izidor Krsnjavi, in Zagreb, Croatia, the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation in Morrilton, Arkansas, the Arkansas Studies Institute, Little Rock, Arkansas, as well as the Seattle Trade Center in Seattle, Washington, Eastern Oregon University, and Florida International University to name a few. Her sculptural work “Voices of Our Ancestors,” is on permanent loan to the Depot Museum in Morrilton, Arkansas, and tells the story of her great, great grandmother Diodema born on the Trail of Tears. As a scholar and artist of Native American (Eastern Oklahoma Delaware-Lenni Lenape) and Norwegian descent, her scholarly work includes national and regional publications in arts education, speaks at conferences, workshops, and public forums both internationally and nationally about art making, visual storytelling, cultural identity, and her current academic scholarship here at the Institute focuses on Narrative Inquiry and Experienced-Based research methods addressing pedagogy in the medical humanities and medical education integrating the arts, which encompasses art making as curriculum, museum/medical education, art historical contexts, the anthropology of art (art cultures), and research in art practice, exploring the theoretical and practical ideas of how the arts disrupt preconceived notions in learning environments. These methodologies are by nature interdisciplinary and re-exam claims of plurality, viability, and cannon as a form of cultural positioning in the arts and arts pedagogy and practice especially when related to the medical humanities.

Dr. Powell-Mullins' creative work focuses on indigenous and isolated histories and ideas and their relationship to contemporary society as landscape.  Her art making involves a variety of mixed methods (encaustic, printmaking, ceramics, and sculpture), exploring indigenous Native American and transcultural conceptions of place and space and the feminine. These conceptions reference the intersecting points of life between and in diverse cultures, involving both the past and the present. She believes her creative scholarship becomes a present day artifact of integrated diversity, a cultural innovation of artistic expression. Foundational to her creative work is the notion of “story” which re-emphasizes the conflictual and the consensual in society, constructing and de-constructing daily identity where the personal, collective, and cultural converge. She says, “for me, art making is a way of adding original dialogue and new ideas, to artistic narratives of knowledge that demonstrate how individual truth, imagination, and experience work together.”

While in residence in the Institute, Dr. Mullins will research the confluence of arts practice in the medical humanities and medical education.

 

Sara van den Berg, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Sara van den Berg, PhD as a Visiting Sara van den Berg, PhDScholar. Dr. van den Berg will be in residence from September 1, 2012 through December 17, 2012.

Dr. van den Berg completed twelve years as Chair of the English Department at Saint Louis University in June 2012, and is spending the Fall 2012 semester in residence at the Institute, working on two research projects: a study of pain and narrative, and a book on the cultural meanings of the dwarf in Western culture since the Renaissance. 
After earning a Doctorate from Yale University, Dr. van den Berg taught at Fordham University and Fairfield University before joining the faculty at Ohio State. There she designed and team-taught a large lecture course on Medicine and the Humanities—one of the first in the country. She then became a faculty member at the University of Washington-Seattle, where she taught Early Modern English literature and also developed a year-long undergraduate sequence in Medicine and Society.
At Saint Louis University, she worked with Mark Clark (now of IMH) and other colleagues to design a successful Interdisciplinary Minor in Medical Humanities. She has published three books, as well as essays on Milton, Shakespeare, Jonson, and Freud, including essays on Freud’s dreams, on the motif of reading and writing in the Dora case, and on the case narratives in Studies in Hysteria. That essay was written for a conference at the Institute, and was published in The Good Body: Asceticism in Modern Culture (edited by Mary Winkler and Letha Cole of IMH).

Dr. van deb Berg's work on pain began with an essay, “Narrative as Measurement of Pain,” presented at a meeting of the International Society for the Study of Narrative two years ago. Her research has been supported by a 2011-12 Presidential Research Fund Grant from Saint Louis University, and she discussed her current project at a recent Pain and Wellbeing Conference in St. Louis. 

Both her research on pain and her study of dwarfism are linked to her teaching and research in Disability Studies. She currently chairs the MLA Committee on Disability Issues, and at SLU-Madrid will teach a graduate seminar on “Disability and the Problem of Perception.” The course will focus on three different forms of disability: blindness, dwarfism, and pain. Blindness is a deficit of perception (and that part of the course will focus on Milton); dwarfism both is and is not perceived as disability; and pain is an “invisible” disability that cannot be objectively measured.

After leaving Galveston in December, Dr. van den Berg will spend the Spring 2013 semester teaching at the SLU campus in Madrid, and in April will be a Visiting Fellow at the History of Pain Project at Birkbeck College-University of London. 

 

Paula Summerly, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Paula Summerly, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Paula Summerly, PhDDr. Summerly will be in residence from August 1, 2012 through January 31, 2013.

Paula Summerly’s academic background is in the history of medicine (PhD, University of Glasgow), palaeopathology (MSc, University of Sheffield), and fine art photography (BA, Sheffield Hallam University). Her doctorate entitled Visual Pathology: A Case Study in Late-Nineteenth Century Clinical Photography in Glasgow, Scotland was funded through a Wellcome Trust scholarship.

Subsequently, she was a researcher on the Forensic Medicine Archives Project at the University of Glasgow, http://www.fmap.archives.gla.ac.uk/

From 2010 to 2011, Dr. Summerly was a Fellow in Medical Humanities and Bioethics at the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago. She undertook research on the history of pediatric clinical photography and the history of forensic photography in conjunction with the Chicago Police Department.

In 2007, Dr. Summerly was awarded a scholarship from the Friends of the Dittrick Medical Museum, Cleveland, Ohio. She researched the dermatological photographs taken by Dr. William Thomas Corlett (1854-1948) and the dissection photographs published in Dissection: Photographs of a Rite of Passage in American Medicine 1880-1930 by John Harley Warner and James Edmonson (Blast Books, 2009).

Dr. Summerly has published papers on a range of subjects including: Sir William Macewen (1848-1924), pioneer of aseptic surgery; photographic evidence; and clinical photography. She has curated temporary and permanent exhibitions including: Photographing Pediatrics: Northwestern University, circa 1900-1940 at the Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University, Chicago (2011); and A Healing Passion: Medicine in Glasgow Past and Present at the Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow (2006). Dr. Summerly has also acted as a freelance consultant for the temporary exhibitions team at the Wellcome Trust, London.

During her time at IMH, Dr. Summerly will research the role of visual knowledge in medicine and the humanities, with a special emphasis on photography. Her interests include the art of clinical observation and patient anonymity. She will also explore and utilize local visual archival sources including the anatomical drawings by  Dr. William Keiller (1861-1931) held in the Blocker History of Medicine Collections at the Moody Medical Library.

 

Richard Armstrong, MPhil, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Richard Armstrong, MPhil, PhD as a Visiting Richard Armstrong, MPhil, PhDScholar. Dr. Armstrong will be in residence from July 1, 2012 through December 31, 2012.

Dr. Armstrong earned a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Chicago, and a Master of Philosophy and a Doctorate from Yale University.

Dr. Armstrong is an Associate Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Houston Honors College.His particular field is the reception of classical culture, with a special focus on its role in the development of psychoanalysis.

His publications include: A Compulsion for Antiquity: Freud and the Ancient World (Cornell UP, 2005); “The Schliemann of the Mind: Sigmund Freud and Archaeology”; “Urorte und Urszenen. Freud und die Figuren der Archäologie”;  “Last Words: Said, Freud, and Traveling Theory”; “Being Mr. Somebody: Freud and Classical Education”; “Marooned Mandarins: Freud, Classical Education, and the Jews of Vienna”; “Quid Berolinum Vindobonae? Die Antike und das Freudsche Netzwerk”; “Psychoanalysis and the Wellsprings of Myth”;  and “Freud and the Drama of Oedipal Truth.” 

Dr. Armstrong is co-editor with Paul Allen Miller of the Ohio State University Press series Ancient Memories / Modern Identities and a contributing editor of American Imago.  He is also a contributor to Engines of Our Ingenuity on KUHF.

 

Joan Paluzzi, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Joan Paluzzi, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Joan Paluzzi, PhDPaluzzi will be in residence from July 1, 2012 through August 31, 2012.

Dr. Paluzzi is a medical anthropologist with over twenty years of experience in critical care nursing prior to returning to school for her doctorate in anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh.  After completing her degree, she worked with the internationally respected NGO, Partners In Health based in Boston where, in addition to her engagement with the work of PIH, she also served as a Senior Fellow and administrative coordinator of the largest task Force within the United Nations Millennium Project: the Task Force on HIV, TB, Malaria and Access to Essential Medicines (PIH served as the sub-Secretariat for the task force.) The project established the Millennium Development Goals and developed the indicators to measure progress towards their attainment which continue to be widely used in international health and development. She served as one of the lead authors on two of the final reports (Tuberculosis and Access to Medicines).  Following the completion of the Millennium Project, Dr. Paluzzi taught cultural and medical anthropology for six years at a university in North Carolina. From 2002 to 2006 she also served as a member of the Advocacy, Communications, and Social Mobilization Working Group within STOP TB, based at WHO in Geneva.

Dr. Paluzzi’s research and publications address various topics all of which deal with the related themes of access to health services and medicines, local-to-global health and healthcare disparities and social justice. Her dissertation research, funded by Fulbright explored the experience of tuberculosis in southern Chile and its intersections with economic inequalities and the ongoing privatization of the Chilean health system.  In addition to her work in Chile, she has done fieldwork in Venezuela that examined the rapid scale-up of their free, public health primary care system and in North Carolina where she examined systems of healthcare recourse for immigrants in the Piedmont Triad. Recent publications have explored the ethical dimensions and relational dynamics that characterize multinational pharmaceutical industry practices.

While at the Institute, she will complete a book project, Tuberculosis and the Consumption of People that moves beyond conventional attributions to poverty (where most discussions of the social determinants of TB begin and end) to identify the ‘causes of the causes’: the larger socio-economic contexts in which TB occurs and the forces that have shaped them. Crossing time and space, the book utilizes specific case studies to situate tuberculosis as the axis joining human experience during three distinct eras, in three distinct locations and within societal contexts dominated by three distinct socio-economic institutions: slavery and segregation (United States), imperial colonialism (American Samoa), and neoliberalism (Chile).  This book illustrates lives lived within personal and social environments that have been constrained, at times violated, by these State-sanctioned, socially-enforced socio-economic institutions and in doing so, clearly demonstrates the fundamentally social roots of health and illness.

 

Terence Wright, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Terence Wright, PhD as a Visiting Scholar.   Dr. Wright will be in residence from May 1, 2012 through July 31, 2012.Terence Wright, PhD

Dr. Wright earned a Master of in Fine Art from Chelsea School of Art; a Master of Arts in Ethnology, University of Oxford and a Doctorate from the University London (1986) for his work on photography and visual perception.

Dr. Wright is Professor of Visual Arts at the University of Ulster, Northern Ireland where he is Course Director for the MFA Photography program. He is a Fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute; board member of the Anthropological Association of Ireland; and affiliated member/visiting researcher at DIGIS (Digital Studio for Research in Design, Visualisation & Communication), University of Cambridge. 

Dr. Wright worked as a freelance photographer for BBC News and Current Affairs, programs such as That’s Life, Rough Justice and Crimewatch, as well as editorial photography for Cosmopolitan, Company and New Scientist.  Among his assignments for the BBC he covered the Libyan People’s Bureau siege in London and the Iranian Airline hijack in Paris in 1984.  In 1998 he returned to Oxford University to establish the research project  ‘Moving Images – the Media Representation of Refugees’ at the university’s Refugee Studies Centre. He was also a Visiting Professor at Kunsthøgskolen i Bergen (Bergen Academy of Art) in Norway (2001-3). In 2003 he joined the University of Ulster where he produced and directed The Interactive Village (2004-7): a digital ethnography of Dolní Roveň a village in Eastern Bohemia, Czech Republic in collaboration with anthropologists from the University of Pardubice as part of ‘NM2’ (New Millennium, New Media EU-funded research project: www.ist-nm2.org). He also produced a FUSION cross-border creative & digital media economic development project forming part of the Northern Ireland Peace Process. The project developed prototype pilot demonstrators providing interactive mobile media guides to Irish history with the overall aim of enabling visitors to access multi-perspective, contested or contradictory histories as well as myth, legend and conjecture. In 2008 he held a Visiting Research Fellowship at CRASSH (Centre for Arts, Social Sciences & Humanities) at the University of Cambridge.

Publications include: The Photography Handbook (2nd ed). London: Taylor & Francis, 2004; Visual Impact: culture and the meaning of Images. Oxford: Berg, 2008;  ‘Drawn from Memory: reminiscing, narrative and the visual image’ International Journal Computers in Healthcare, 2010; ‘Photography and Visual Rhetoric’ in The SAGE Handbook of Visual Research Methods. London: Sage, 2011; “Visual Culture, Ethnography and Interactive Media” in A Companion to the Anthropology of Europe. Oxford: Blackwell, 2012.

Dr. Wright's current research project “The Memory Game” is a visual media iPad-based system for reminiscing, supporting memories of people with dementia. During his visit to IMH he will be working in this area of study conducting further research into the theoretical dimensions of reminiscing and memory. 

Sue Gena Lurie, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Sue Gena Lurie, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Sue Gena Lurie, PhDDr. Lurie will be in residence from January 1, 2012 through June 30, 2012.

Dr. Lurie is a medical anthropologist and recently retired faculty member in Social and Behavioral Sciences in the School of Public Health, and Medical Humanities, at the University of North Texas Health Science Center – Fort Worth, and Anthropology at the University of North Texas.

She received a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Oklahoma (1983) and was a National Institute of Mental Health Post-Doctoral Fellow in “Ethnography and Public Policy” at Northwestern University’s Anthropology Department (1984-85).

From 1987 to 2012, Dr. Lurie taught social and behavioral theory and community health; social justice, human rights and ethics; medical and psychological anthropology; and qualitative research methods. At the school of public health she co-directed the MPH/MS Applied Anthropology program, and directed Dr. P.H. dissertations. In 2005 she received a public health education award, and from the Fall of 2009 to the Spring of 2010 she was a Fulbright Fellow lecturing in Bioethics, and Medical Anthropology at the Semmelweis Medical University, Budapest, Hungary.

Dr. Lurie’s research and writing have been on comparative health and medical systems; and  professionalization and professions - from her dissertation on the professionalization of nursing during Hong Kong’s reform era (1967-1980); to the comparative development of HK’s nursing and social work professions; and the professionalization of Physician Assistants in the United States. In addition she has studied: community mental health care; the needs of elderly and homeless people; tuberculosis education with Hispanic organizations for the Centers for Disease Control; and conducted health needs assessments for the Susan G. Komen Foundation. She co-authored Health-Seeking Behavior in Ethnic Populations with Tyson Gibbs, and has, in addition, published journal articles and chapters on public health policy, research ethics, mental health care systems, urban homelessness, and comparative health planning with non-governmental organizations. 

At the Institute, she is expanding on her historical research (with Gordon Lurie) developing a “transnational analysis” of medicine, professionalization, and public health which joined Central Europe, the U. S., and the developing world throughout the twentieth century. Her current work focuses on the development and transformation of a key organization – the American Medical Association of Vienna (1904-1938) and its post-war successor, the American Medical Society of Vienna (1952-1990). This organization is part of a complex of similar groups such as the Anglo-American Medical Association of Berlin (1903-1938), and others in Paris and London. This study, which began in 2009, uses Hong Kong’s transnational experience on professionalization and its network-city urban program as a template for reconsidering health and professionalization in Vienna and Central Europe during both the interwar years and the Cold War era. A preliminary paper was presented at the American Anthropological Association Meetings in 2010. Drawing on the extant archives of the AMA of Vienna and the AMS of Vienna which were gathered in 2009-2010, and access received to the American Medical Association archives in Chicago, she hopes to develop grant funding to pursue research in Europe, the United States, and (for the Cold War era) South Asia and the Middle East.

Jane Chance, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Jane Chance, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Jane Chance, PhDDr. Chance will be in residence from September 2011 through April 2012.

Dr. Chance is the Andrew W. Mellon Distinguished Professor Emerita in English at Rice University. She has taught medieval literature for forty years.

Dr. Chance earned a Bachelor of Arts from Purdue University, a Master of Arts from University of Illinois, and a Doctorate in English from the University of Illinois.

Dr. Chance has published twenty-one books and nearly a hundred articles and reviews, on mythography and classical influence on medieval literature; Old and Middle English literature, especially Chaucer; medieval women; and modern medievalism (Tolkien in particular). Her most recent book, The Literary Subversions of Medieval Women (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), was awarded the 2008 SCMLA Book Prize. General editor of the Library of Medieval Women (published by Boydell & Brewer), with twenty-three titles in print, she has also edited the Greenwood series Historic Events in the Medieval World, with twelve titles published in 2004-5, and the newer Praeger Series on the Middle Ages, with five titles as of 2011.

Dr. Chance has been an NEH and Guggenheim Fellow, a member of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton,a Visiting Research Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh, Eccles Fellow at the University of Utah Humanities Center, and director of both an NEH Summer Seminar  and an Institute for College Teachers. She has also enjoyed a residency at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio on Lake Como. In spring, 2003, she held NEH and Mellon Fellowships at St. Louis University. She has delivered many guest and keynote lectures in the U.S. and around the world. Recently, she served as the chair of the Modern Language Association Roth Committee for the Best Literary Translation (and was asked to return this summer unexpectedly); she is currently a member of the PMLA Advisory Committee.

Dr. Chance's major project at the IMH is a guest-edited issue of the new journal Postmedieval: a Journal of Medieval Cultural Studies, on Cognitive Alterities/Neuromedievalism. This subject involves the ways in which the findings of neuroscientific research can be used to better understand the rise in the later Middle Ages of affective piety and mysticism, particularly by women, literary dream allegory, and other forms of embodied cognition in philosophy and theology. She also hopes to complete the third volume of Medieval Mythography, on The Emergence of Italian Humanism, in which myth interpretation by fourteenth and fifteenth-century poet-scholars becomes a vehicle for projections of self and the personal.

Dr. Chance has recently taken up photography and has shown in many juried competitions in Galveston, Clear Lake, and Houston. She is proud of her Galveston and Texas Landmark house, which, through research at the Rosenberg Library, she discovered was originally owned by one of the first settlers of Galveston, a Norwegian sea-captain; the daughter of Henry Fisher, coauthor of the 1842 land grant act that brought northern Europeans to the Hill Country; and Sam Houston’s grandnephew—all in its first four years.

Kirsten Ostherr, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Dr. Kirsten Ostherr as a Visiting Scholar. Kirsten Ostherr, PhDDr. Ostherr will be in residence from September 2011 through December 2011.

Dr. Ostherr is Associate Professor of English at Rice University in Houston, TX, where she teaches film and media studies, with a special emphasis on historical and contemporary representations of health and disease in photography, film, television, animation, advertising, and medical imaging. She is also a Fellow in The John P. McGovern, M.D. Center for Humanities and Ethics, at the University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX.

Dr. Ostherr’s most recent work focuses on networked patients and hospitals, social media and health movements, and the age of bioinformatics. She is author of Cinematic Prophylaxis: Globalization and Contagion in the Discourse of World Health (Duke, 2005), and during her time at the Institute for Medical Humanities, she will be completing Medical Visions: Producing the Patient through Film, Television and Imaging Technologies  (Oxford). Ostherr has recently published or has forthcoming articles on medical animation in the 1920s, health education films of the postwar period, narrative medicine and biocultures, ethical issues in the film Philadelphia, and corporate publicity films. She has also published on art film, documentary, and science fiction film. Professor Ostherr lectures widely and has recently given invited talks in Geneva, Chicago, San Diego, Galveston, Houston, Philadelphia, and New York. Her work has been supported by a variety of grants and fellowships.

Dr. Ostherr is currently developing the Medical Futures Initiative, an institute for training the medical media innovators of the future through creative, hands-on critical thinking and design. This project will foster a creative environment for imagining what the future of medicine should be; create media and other tools for improving healthcare and medical education; and teach pre-med students to think analytically and historically about medicine, science, and technology. A cornerstone of Medical Futures is “Project TMC,” a pilot program that joins Rice undergraduates with Texas Medical Center physician-researchers to develop videos and other communications media that translate their work for patients and the wider health community. Kirsten looks forward to discussing this project and her research with the UTMB Institute for the Medical Humanities community.

 

Erma Lawson, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Erma Lawson, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Erma Lawson, PhDLawson will be in residence from August 2011 through November 2011.

Dr. Lawson combines Nursing and Medical Sociology to focus on health and illness among underserved populations.  She is an Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas. She has held many clinical positions, including Assistant Director of Nursing, Kentucky State Hospital, Charge Nurse at Grady Memorial Hospital, Obstetrics /Gynecology, Atlanta, Georgia. She has also held clinical positions in the emergency room, neonatal intensive care, cardiac intensive care, and home health nursing.

Dr. Lawson earned a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Howard University and a Doctorate in Medical Sociology from the University of Kentucky, Departments of Sociology and Behavioral Science. Her dissertation combined qualitative and quantitative methods to examine the meaning of smoking among Appalachian pregnant adolescents. 

To develop an in-depth understanding of grounded theory, Dr. Lawson studied with the late Dr. Anselm Strauss, University of California, Berkeley, CA.  Also she lived in Zimbabwe, Africa, for two years, exploring stress, birth outcomes, and family stability using narrative methodology.  As a post-doctoral scholar at Harvard University, Department of Public Health Practice, she explored violence, heart disease, stress, among young inner city adolescents.

She has given many scholarly presentations internationally, in countries including Buenos Aires, Argentina; Havana, Cuba; Auckland, Zealand; Sydney Australia; and Johannesburg, South African. 

In 2005, Dr. Lawson was awarded the American Sociology Congressional Fellowship in the office of Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson (30th district) Texas in which she wrote several bills debated in the U.S. House of Representatives, and passed to the U.S. Senate. Dr. Lawson’s publications have centered on health disparities; Katrina survivors and Spirituality; and family instability. She is the first author of Black Men and Divorce (Sage, publications). She was appointed to the Panel of Minority Women health expert to advise the Department Women’s Health at DHHS.

Dr. Lawson's current research focuses on the medicalization of race through organ transplantation. At IMH, she plans to complete a book on the experience of minority heart transplant recipients and health disparities.

 

David Brenner, MA, PhD David Brenner, MA, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome David Brenner, MA, PhD as a Visiting cholar. Dr. Brenner will be in residence from June 2011 through July 2011.

Dr. Brenner teaches Comparative Literature and Jewish Studies at the University of Houston. He is the author of two books, Marketing Identities: The Invention of Jewish Ethnicity (Wayne State University Press, 1998) and German-Jewish Popular Culture before the Holocaust (Routledge, 2008). His current book project, Schindler's Shoah: Teaching the Holocaust in the Age of Globalization, focuses on the pedagogy of genocide education. While interacting with students and faculty at the Institute for the Medical Humanities at UTMB, he will be specifically examining the challenges and opportunities of using the Holocaust as a paradigmatic case study for medical ethics.

 

Sefik Gorkey, PhD

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Sefik Gorkey, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Sefik Gorkey, PhDGorkey will be in residence from April 2011 through August 2011.

Dr. Gorkey graduated from Istanbul University Faculty of Dentistry in 1985 and earned a doctoral degree in 1989. He started lecturing in Marmara University Faculty of Medicine in 1993 as a founder of the Department of Medical Ethics and History of Medicine. He was appointed as a Professor in 1999 and has been Chair of the department since 1994.

Dr. Gorkey has published in the field of medical ethics, history of medicine, and ethical issues in dental practice and research. He has teaching experience in medical ethics, dental ethics, and history of medicine. He has taken responsibility as a member in REC's in medical and dental schools, some research hospitals in Istanbul, Istanbul Chamber of Physicians Ethics Committee and Ministry of Health, Stem Cell Adhoc Ethics Committee in Turkey. He is also a founding and current board member of the International Dental Ethics and Law Society (IDEALS).

He is now visiting IMH as a visiting scholar for a project of “Medicine in Art: In western painting tradition” and an elective course model / proposal for medical humanities curriculum on the same topic. The subtopics related for the project are; diseases (hormonal anomalies, dermatological diseases, eye diseases, rheumatism, leprosy, blindness, etc.) epidemics (specifically plague), birth scenes, patient physician relationship, disable people, treatment methods through centuries in paintings, dentistry, charlatans, dissection scenes, medical education in western paintings (specifically Italian and Dutch art).

 

 

  • Meet Dr. Rolf Ahlzen

    February 1, 2011, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Rolf Ahlzen, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Rolf Ahlzen, MD, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Ahlzen will be in residence from February 2011 through March 2011.

    Dr. Ahlzen describes himself and his work as follows:

    "My project may be seen as the outflow of a long standing interest in the borderlands between medicine and the humanities. I have long been a member of two communities and I have had one foot solidly anchored in each of them. The one is the academic community of researchers and teachers, in areas more or less clearly related to medicine. The other is the field of medical and health care practitioners, who are more or less (usually the latter) interested in theories and abstractions concerning the philosophical and ethical foundations of their practice. And, somewhat like C.P. Snow's vision of “the two cultures” – they do not really seem to meet each other."

    "My interests are wide ranging and my recent PhD work concerns the potential of literature to contribute to clinical skills. This is the line I would like to pursue during a stay in Galveston. I am intrigued and indeed worried, by the gap that far too often seems to exist between medical practitioners and scholars of medical humanities. Indeed, there are many encouraging exceptions. But why, may we ask, do clinicians so relatively seldom approach and learn from the undoubtedly often very practically relevant research done in medical humanities? And even more so: Why do those engaged in medical humanities so relatively seldom, if ever, try the idea that medicine, clinical medicine in particular, has something to contribute to their understanding of their fields of the humanities? That we are indeed dealing with a reciprocal relationship, where both parties could and should approach each other with humility and openness, prepared to learn from each other?"

    "Some twenty years ago, Leon Kass asked, in the Hastings Centre Review, worrying questions about the booming medical ethics business and its probably relatively small impact on actual clinical conduct. Should we ask the same question to what was, in a sense, a reply to Kass' questions: the medical humanities movement? How do we make a difference? The recent debate in Academic Medicine (2010) illuminates many of the core questions that I would like to raise and pursue. These questions of course concern medical education on all levels, but also the role of humanities in general in an era of consumerism and hard economic winds blowing in most countries' health care systems. "

    "We do need medical humanities. Urgently, more than ever. But we must - without falling into the trap of only accepting one basic kind of proof in this field, the one copied on medical evidence – find ways of reaching right into practice and show that MH makes a difference. This must mean that MH scholars are prepared to learn from practitioners and to be acquainted with their ways of thinking and acting. Medical humanities must be founded on a richer and more truthful understanding of what practical knowledge is.  This is what I plan to discuss, learn and write about during a stay in Galveston."

  • Meet Dr. Ben Rich

    November 1, 2010, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Ben A. Rich, JD, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Ben A. Rich, JD, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Rich will be in residence in November 2010.

    Dr. Rich is the School of Medicine Alumni Association Endowed Chair of Bioethics at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine. Prior to becoming an academic bioethicist he was an attorney specializing in health care and higher education law in North Carolina and then Colorado.

    Dr. Rich's academic work has been primarily in the area of end of life care, with a special focus on advance care planning, decisions to withhold and withdraw life-sustaining interventions, and the ethical, legal, and policy issues in pain management and palliative care. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the American Pain Foundation and the Council on Ethics of the American Academy of Pain Medicine.

    The working title for his sabbatical leave project, on which he will be working while at UTMB is “Suffering, Healing, and Palliative Options of Last Resort: The Clinician's Responsibility To Patients at the End of Life.” Of special interest and concern to Professor Rich in this project are contemporary controversies over the nature of human suffering in the context of advanced terminal illness, and the circumstances under which patients should be provided access to palliative sedation or, where legal, a lethal prescription. Among the related questions which he plans to explore through engagement with UTMB faculty, graduate, and professional students are: 

    • Is “existential suffering” a legitimately distinct category of human suffering that can be diagnosed and that calls for its own distinct approach to palliative interventions, or is all human suffering by its very nature existential?

    • Are there legitimate and realistic restorative goals that dying patients should be admonished to and supported in pursuing, and how should clinicians respond when patients decline to pursue or fail to achieve such restorative goals?

    • What is the role and significance of meaning and dignity in the context of terminal illness and the process of dying?

    • Is a patient's concept of a medical fate worse than death one which palliative care professionals ought to embrace and accommodate?

    • What are the proper roles for causation and intent in ascertaining the ethical valence of acts or omissions in the care of the terminally ill or imminently dying patient?

    • What is the relevance of the proximity of death to the availability of palliative options?
  • Meet Dr. Graeme Harper

    October 1, 2010, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Graeme Harper, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Graeme Harper, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Harper will be in residence from October 2010 through December 2010.

    Dr. Harper is a Professor of Creative Writing and Honorary Research Professor in the Creative Arts, in Wales and England respectively. He has been foundation Chair of the National Institute for Excellence in the Creative Industries, and was Director of Research in the College of Arts and Humanities at Bangor University, UK, from 2007-2010. Most recently he has been Research Fellow in MARBL at Emory University and prior to that Paschal P. Vacca Distinguished Chair of Liberal Arts at the University of Montevallo, Alabama.

    Dr. Harper is currently undertaking his “creative habitats” project, an investigation of the creation of personal and cultural domains that support human creativity and “creative benefaction”, while also completing his new novel, Medicine (Parlor, 2011). Both of these he will be developing at UTMB. His previous work includes such works as Signs of Life: Cinema and Medicine (2005), edited with A.Moor and, as Brooke Biaz, Moon Dance (2010), a novel about birth and the space race. He holds doctorates from the University of East Anglia, UK, and the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia, and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine.

  • Meet Dr. Charles McClelland

    September 1, 2010, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Charles McClelland, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Charles McClelland, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. McClelland will be in residence from September 2010 through April 2011.

    Dr. McClelland comes to the Institute as a continuation of his extensive research interests. Since becoming Professor Emeritus (History) at the University of New Mexico (UNM), during the last decade he served as a Fellow of the Fulbright program and then of the German Alexander-von-Humboldt Foundation in Berlin. He has also been a Fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities and the (Princeton) Institute for Advanced Study. He was a cofounder of the German Studies Association of the United States, Director of European Studies at UNM and President of the American Association of University Professors in New Mexico for many years, among other professional activities.

    Having grown up in Galveston, Dr. McClelland went on to earn his bachelor's degree from Princeton and his doctorate from Yale before teaching history at Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania, UNM and the (Humboldt) University of Berlin. He speaks and reads 12 modern languages and has traveled extensively in Latin America and Europe

    .Published by major American and European academic presses and journals, Dr. McClelland's numerous books and articles have often pursued questions about the sociology of knowledge: how do scientists, scholars and other modern professional leaders know what they claim they know? Much of his work has focused on the rise of “professional” and “expert” knowledge in modern European and North American societies. His books include the (now classic) study of the rise of the modern German university system (a leading model for America), as well as a unique study of the professionalization struggles of German and other European artists in the past two centuries. His contribution to the massive bicentennial history of the University of Berlin is appearing along with five companion volumes during 2010-11.;

    Dr. McClelland will bring his experience with European universities, medical schools and museums to bear as a member of the task force designing a medical-history museum in UTMB's original (1891) Ashbel Smith Building, “Old Red.” He will also lead an advanced seminar (Spring 2011) on the comparative history of medical professionalization and ethics in the Institute for the Medical Humanities. He is looking forward to interacting with members of the IMH faculty and with graduate students and his fellow visiting scholars.

  • Meet Dr. Michael Collins

    June 1, 2010, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Michael Collins, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Michael Collins, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Collins will be in residence from June 2010 through August 2010.

    Dr. Collins is currently an Associate Professor of English at Texas A & M University.

    While at the Institute, Dr. Collins will be working on two books. The first (under contract with the University of South Carolina Press) explores the challenge to American conceptions of deviance and criminality posed by the work of the late Etheridge Knight, an African American poet who published his first book while serving an eight-year prison sentence. The subject of the second book is the “God Point,” which Collins defines as the limit of human cognition--the limit of the human capacity to separate information from noise. (Noise in turn is defined to include misinformation). The authors Collins focuses on in the second book are those who depict the ways and means of misinformation and other noise production--and the ways and means of progress away from noise toward the “God Point.” Essays that are the basis for the two books have appeared in PMLA, Modern Philology, and other journals.

  • Meet Dr. Mahala Yates Stripling

    May 1, 2010, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Mahala Yates Stripling, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Mahala Yates Stripling, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Stripling will be in residence in May 2010.

    Dr. Stripling is an independent scholar with a background in rhetoric who is writing Imagine a Man: the Surgeon Storyteller, a literary biography of Richard Selzer, M.D. She has finished Part I, “Reinventing his Life,” and while in residence at The Institute for the Medical Humanities will do extensive research in the Selzer Archive, Truman G. Blocker, Jr., History of Medicine Collections, Moody Medical Library, for Part II, “Living by his Wits Alone.” Her work examines the life and writings of one of the finest writers of short prose in English. First as a surgeon, he confronted the vast expanse of illness and disease; then as a writer, beginning full-time in 1985, he flowered in an entirely new way, describing the profound humanity of his patients in fictional stories. He is giving the evolving canon of literature and medicine a new language for our time. Stripling is the author of Bioethics and Medical Issues in Literature, Greenwood Press, 2005.

  • Meet Dr. Sabine Arnaud

    January 1, 2010, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Sabine Arnaud, PhDThe UTMB Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Sabine Arnaud, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Arnaud will be in residence from January 2010 through May 2010.

    Dr. Arnaud is a tenure-track Assistant Professor of French Studies at Texas A&M University. Her research focuses on the production and diffusion of medical knowledge between 1670 and 1820 and intertwines methodologies of literary criticism, history of medicine, and epistemology. Her interest in tracing the circulation of medical categories has been informed by an academic background in Aesthetics, Philosophy, Comparative Literature, and History and Civilizations.

    While in residence at The Institute for the Medical Humanities, she is working on a monograph entitled "Narratives and Politics of a Diagnosis: The Construction and Circulation of the Category of Hysteria in France and England 1730-1820." This work examines how perceptions of hysteria are displaced and recalled across literary, medical and political texts a century before the advent of psychoanalysis. It analyzes the use of imaginings and writing techniques in the production and the diffusion of knowledge. The monograph will further an approach developed while editing and writing the introduction for La Philosophie des Vapeurs, released by Mercure de France, and preparing articles published by journals including Gesnerus, Annales, and Dix-Huitième Siècle.

  • Meet Dr. Frances Rapport

    July 1, 2009, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Frances Rapport, PhD, MPhil, BAThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Frances Rapport, PhD, MPhil, BA as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Rapport will be in residence from July 2009 through November 2009.

    Dr. Rapport is a social scientist with a background in the Arts. She is Professor of Qualitative Health Research at the School of Medicine, Swansea University, UK, and Head of the Qualitative Research Unit. She also holds the position of Visiting Professor at Bournemouth University, UK, is an Honorary Senior Research Fellow at De Montfort University, Leicester and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.

    Dr. Rapport's research interests include: innovative methodological approaches to qualitative health research, advances in the field of qualitative methodology in healthcare and the social sciences and Assisted Reproductive Technology Medicine. She has written extensively about the scope of New Qualitative Methodologies for research in the health services and is currently exploring ‘within-method' approaches to health professionals' and patients' reflections on inhabited workspaces and patient-centred professionalism.

    Dr. Rapport is also working on developing ethnographic poetic representations of Holocaust survivors' testimonials to present their views on health and wellbeing in relation to this extraordinary event. 

    Whilst at the Institute of Medical Humanities at UTMB, Galveston, Dr. Rapport will be developing a joint research application around comparisons between UK and US family practitioners in terms of patient-professional communication in the workplace and practitioners' sense of self in relation to patient-centred care and professionalism.
  • Meet Dr. Leah DeVun

    September 1, 2008, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Leah DeVun, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Leah DeVun, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. DeVun will be in residence from September 2008 through December 2008.

    Dr. DeVun focuses on the history of science and the history of gender, sex, and sexuality in medieval and early modern Europe. She also studies the legacy of these concepts in the modern world. Her current project is Enter Sex: Science, Hermaphrodites, and the Demands of Difference, which examines the history of sex difference by looking at how scientists and physicians have conceived of biological sex -- particularly through their approaches to intersex -- in the past and present.

    Dr. DeVun is an Assistant Professor of History at Texas A&M University, and she is the author of Prophecy, Alchemy, and the End of Time (forthcoming from Columbia University Press). She also writes about feminism and culture for a number of popular magazines.

    During her fellowship period at the IMH (fall semester of 2008), Dr. DeVun is completing an article entitled “Cures and Closures: Surgery, Intersex, and the Demands of Difference,” which is drawn from a chapter of her book project.

  • Meet Dr. Kenneth Kipnis

    September 1, 2008, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Kenneth Kipnis, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Kenneth Kipnis, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Kipnis will be in residence from September 2008 through May 2009.

    Dr. Kipnis is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. He has written extensively on ethics in health care, including disaster medicine, the treatment of low-birthweight infants, breaching confidentiality, the surgical "normalization" of infants with ambiguous genitalia and the foundations of professional ethics. He has taught medical ethics for over 30 years and has done clinical ethics consultation and expert ethics testimony.

  • Meet Dr. David Adams

    September 1, 2007, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    David M Adams, PhD, MLSThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome David Michael Adams, PhD, MLS as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Adams will be in residence from September 2007 through November 2007.

    During his stay at the Institute, Dr. Adams plans to work on several projects in the area of clinical ethics, each one exploring the role and purpose of “ethicists” and of ethics consultation in the clinical setting. One project investigats the role of consensus formation as a way of imparting moral authority to the process of ethics consultation, while another critically examins claims that philosophical methods of analysis have a distinctive role to play in resolving moral dilemmas at the bedside. A third project in the history of bioethics argues for a revised understanding of the moral demands in medical practice which brought philosophers, theologians, and other “outsiders” into the clinic, and from which contemporary “bioethics” is said to have emerged.

    Dr. Adams is a graduate of the University of California at Berkeley, the University of Washington, and Stanford University. He is currently doing graduate work in bioethics and health policy at Loyola University of Chicago.

  • Meet Dr. Rebecca Laroche

    January 1, 2007, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Rebecca Laroche, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Rebecca Laroche, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Laroche will be in residence from January 2007 through August 2007.

    During her time with the Institute, Dr. Laroche plans to complete her current book manuscript, Herbal Rhetoric: Englishwomen's Texts and Medical Authority, 1550-1650.

    Dr. Laroche's research in part demonstrates that women in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries owned large and expensive volumes of medical texts and wrote on and about these texts with authority. In addition to UTMB's support of this portion of her work, the entire project on women's writing in the context of herbal practice has received support from the Huntington, Folger Shakespeare, and Yale Beinecke Libraries.

    In addition to work on her book, Dr. Laroche plans to work with graduate students in their research interests, she also will present two papers, "'Helpes in their own fieldes and gardens': Women's ownership of English herbals, 1550-1700" and "Rosemary, Roses, and Borage: One woman's herbalism in seventeenth-century England."

  • Meet Dr. Jurate Sakalys

    March 1, 2006, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Jurate Sakalys, PhD, RN as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Sakalys will be in residence from March 2006 through April 2006.
  • Meet Dr. Petra Kuppers

    January 1, 2006, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Petra Kuppers, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Kuppers will be in residence in 2006.
  • Meet Dr. Suzanne Poirier

    January 1, 2006, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Suzanne Poirier, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Poirier will be in residence from January 1, 2006 through April 30, 2006.
  • Meet Dr. Meredith Raimondo

    September 1, 2005, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Meredith Raimondo, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Meredith Raimondo, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Raimondo will be in residence from September 2005 through January 2006.

    Dr. Raimondois an Assistant Professor of Comparative American Studies at Oberlin College. She is working on a manuscript which uses theoretical frameworks from media studies, cultural geography, and the history of public health explore representations of the geography of the AIDS epidemic in the United States. It traces the contours and shifting scale of narratives that track the gendered and racialized movement of HIV around the globe and within the nation, from research into its “origin” to its movement in rural areas. In addition, Dr. Raimondo is working on an essay which analyzes photographs of President Bush's 2002 trip to five African nations to think through human rights and the militarization of global health discourse.

  • Meet Dr. Kimberley Weathers

    July 1, 2005, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Kimberley Green Weathers, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Kimberley Green Weathers, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Weathers will be in residence from July 2005 through September 2005.

    Dr. Weathers is an adjunct member of the University of Maryland-University College faculty. The focus of her work at the Institute is a history of national health insurance in the United States. This study will bring together the social and political elements of the story and provide historical perspective for the current debate.

    Dr. Weathers earned a Bachelor of Arts from Stephen F. Austin State University and a Master of Arts and a Doctorate from the University of Houston.

  • Meet Ms. Laura Hermer

    September 1, 2004, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Laura Hermer, JD, LLM The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Laura Hermer, JD, LLM as a Visiting Scholar. Ms. Hermer will be in residence from September 2004 through August 2005.

    Ms. Hermer is a health care attorney and policy analyst who specializes in issues impacting access to health care in the United States. While at the Institute, Ms. Hermer is completing a study of U.S. health care access from a patient-centered perspective. The study provides an overview and analysis of the different legal and economic means by which most Americans obtain access to medical care. It offers suggestions for improving each while maintaining the present system largely intact, as well as a proposal for modifying the system to provide cost-effective primary care access for all U.S. residents. Ms. Hermer is additionally an adjunct member of the Institute. In this capacity, she is working with both the graduate students and medical students in fall 2004, co-teaching bioethics and Texas health policy, respectively, and teaching a seminar on health policy in the spring.

  • Meet Dr. Hannah Landecker

    January 1, 2004, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Hannah Landecker, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Hannah Landecker, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Landecker will be in residence from January 2004 through June 2004.

    While at the Institute, Dr. Landecker is working on a project that examines the changing human relationship to living matter in an age of biotechnology. Through a history of the technical manipulation of living cells, she looks at how biological things, including those made with human tissues, have been turned into tools and commercial objects. She is also working on developing new methods and curricula for teaching the history and social study of biotechnology to undergraduates.

    Dr. Landecker earned a Bachelor of Science from the University of British Columbia and a Doctorate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Program in Science, Technology and Society.

    Dr. Landecker is an Associate Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles.

  • Meet Dr. Stephen Pemberton

    January 1, 2004, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Stephen Pemberton, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Stephen Pemberton, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Pemberton will be in residence from January 2004 through March 2004.

    Dr. Pemberton is a historian of medicine and Assistant Professor in the Federated Department of History at the New Jersey Institute of Technology - Rutgers University, Newark. He is writing a book about the history of hemophilia in the United States, entitled Passport to Normality: Hemophilia and the Ironies of Biomedical Progress in the Twentieth Century. As an IMH visiting scholar, Dr. Pemberton investigated hemophilia's history as a sex-linked disorder, and how that history has impacted efforts by hematologists and other medical professionals to manage this disease. His training in history (MA/PhD) and philosophy (MA) informs his work, as does his past professional experience working at the Medical School at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
  • Meet Dr. Jean Brink

    September 1, 2003, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Jean Brink, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Jean Brink, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Brink will be in residence from September 2003 through November 2003.

    Dr. Brink comes to the Institute from the Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA, where she is a research scholar. Her project, "Death Watch: The ‘Good Death' Reconsidered," examines the ars moriendi (arts of dying) historically and as a contemporary cultural phenomenon. At the Institute her research will focus on a cost/benefit analysis of hospice as a social movement and has included personal narratives and interviews with hospice workers.

    Dr. Brink earned a Bachelor of Arts from Northwestern University, a Master of Arts from Harvard University, and a Doctorate from University of Wisconsin.

    Dr. Brink formerly taught Shakespeare and Milton at Arizona State University (1974-2002) where she founded and directed the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. She is the author of Michael Drayton Revisited (1990) and has published biographical articles on Edmund Spenser as well as studies of Elizabethan culture.

  • Meet Dr. Lun Li

    July 1, 2003, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Lun Li, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Lun Li, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Li will be in residence from July 2003 through June 2004.

    Dr. Lun Li is an Associate Professor at the Institute of Ethics, Hunan Normal University, China. Prior to joining Hunan Normal University, he completed a fellowship in research research ethics at the Harvard University School of Public Health. Dr. Li taught at Central South University Xiang-Ya School of Medicine (then Hunan Medical University) in 1991-1999. He launched Chinese Bioethics Website in 1999 and co-launched a bioethics library project in 2000.

    Dr. Li's current interests include bioethics and cyberethics. In 2002-2004, he working on a research project entitled "Influence of Japanese Criminal Human Experiments in China 1931-1945 and the American Cover-up on Postwar Research Ethics in China."

    While at the Institute, Dr. Li will focus on "Ethical Responsibilities in Biomedical Research in the Context of Immoral Societies: Reflections on Japanese Medical Atrocity in China 1932-45."

  • Meet Dr. Alex Lubet

    July 1, 2003, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Alex Lubet, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Alex Lubet, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Lubet will be in residence from July 2003 through August 2003.

    Dr. Lubet comes to the Institute from Minneapolis, Minnesota where he is the Morse Alumni distinguished Teaching Professor of Music and an Adjunct Professor of American and Jewish Studies. His work here involved Disability Studies and Performing Arts Medicine.

  • Meet Dr. Jean Arrigo

    March 31, 2003, 23:00 PM by Julia Essex

    The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Jean Maria Arrigo, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Arrigo will be in residence in April 2003.

    Dr. Arrigo is a social psychologist who focuses on epistemology and ethics of military intelligence. She presented to IMH "A Consequentialist Argument against Torture Interrogation of Terrorist Suspects" and a critique of the Final Report of the President's Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments. Cheryl Kaplan, Director of UTMB Theatre Outreach and Education, directed Arrigo's play, The People Who Disappeared Twice—a Cold War tale of weapons experiments in testimony, myth, and song—with music by John Crigler.

  • Meet Dr. Haavi Morreim

    October 1, 2002, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    E. Haavi Morreim, PhDThe UTMB Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome E. Haavi Morreim, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Morreim will be in residence from October 2002 through November 2002.

    Dr. Morreim is a professor of bioethics at the College of Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Much of her work has been interdisciplinary, and she has written a number of articles at the intersection of law, medicine, economics, and ethics.

    While at the Institute, Dr. Morreim will be working on "Emerging Litigation Issues in Human Clinical Research Trials," an exploration of the ways in which courts and the common law are ill-prepared to address the distinctive issues that arise in clinical research.

  • Meet Dr. Ruth Cecire

    June 1, 2002, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Ruth Cecire, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Ruth Cecire, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Cecire will be in residence from June 2002 through November 2002.

    Dr. Cecire earned a Doctorate in Religion and Social Ethics from the University of Southern California.

    Before returning to academia, Dr. Cecire served as Director of the Office of Special Projects for Correctional Health at the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation.

    Dr. Cecire's current projects include an examination of the meanings and implications of the health/punishment interface, a feminist analysis of the specific implications of punishment-linked beneficence for women, and an exploration of the ethics of inmate participation in clinical research focusing on issues of equity and coercion.

  • Meet Dr. Albin Eser

    January 1, 2002, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Albin Eser, JD, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Eser will be in residence from January 2002 through March 2002.

    Dr. Eser came to the Institute from Freiburg, Germany. He was born in Bavaria and studied law at the University of Berlin. The practice of law was his work from 1958 - 1964, during which time he spent a year as a Fellow at the Institute of Comparative Law of New York University, concluding with the M.C.M. degree.

    Dr. Eser is the Director of the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, a member of the Board of Directors of the Centre for Ethics and Law in Medicine, University of Freiburg, and Chairman of Committee on Investigating Manipulations of Research Papers and Medical Publications.

    While at the Institute, Dr. Eser will be working on a project entitled, "Misconduct in Medical Research". He will also present a colloquium on "Misconduct in Science: A German Lesson".

  • Meet Dr. Susanna Gilbert

    January 1, 2002, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Susanna Gilbert, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Gilbert will be in residence from January 2002 through April 2002.

    Dr. Gilbert earned a Bachlor of Arts in English from Yale University and a Master of Arts and Doctorate in English from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

    While at the Institute, Dr. Gilbert will be studying "In Your Face: Figuring the Disfigured Face in American Culture and Literature." She will also present a colloquium during her stay at the Institute titled "I Scream the Body Electric: Mark O'Brien's Cyborg Voice".

  • Meet Dr. Amy Fairchild

    January 1, 2002, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Amy Fairchild, PhD, MPHThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Amy Fairchild, PhD, MPH as a Visiting Scholar.

    Dr. Fairchild is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Sociomedical Sciences at Columbia University. She is also the Assistant Director for Scholarly and Academic Affairs in their Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health.

    Dr. Fairchild is a historian researching the broad social forces that produce disease and shape public health policy and a public health policy analyst focused on dilemmas in the ethics and politics of contemporary debates. Guided by the understanding that history and policy do not simply represent two different worlds, she fuses these frameworks of analysis, crafting a new, historically grounded way of thinking critically about problems in a professional field. Her work's central intellectual theme has been to explore the functions and limits of the State, particularly when it seeks to address health issues that touch on groups marginalized by virtue of disease, class, and race.

    Dr. Fairchild's book, Science at the Borders is a revisionist history uncovering the ways that the machinery of processing unskilled immigrant laborers at the nation's borders in the early 1900's helped to define inclusion into industrial citizenship, the state, and social power. Searching Eyes: Privacy, the State and Disease Surveillance in America focuses on policy challenges that arise when it becomes necessary to report the names of individuals with disease. Written with Ronald Bayer and James Colgrove, Searching Eyes sets controversies over surveillance for diseases and conditions, including tuberculosis, venereal disease, birth defects, occupational disease, cancer, vaccination status, and HIV against the backdrop of the changing social, political, and personal meanings of privacy.

    While at the Institute, Dr. Fairchild will be working on “Community and Confinement: The Evolving Experience of Isolation for Leprosy in Carville, Louisiana,” which considers patients' role in shaping a federal institution from 1920 through 1950 as their sense of themselves as a community grew and then faded.

  • Meet Dr. Ivan Crozier

    October 1, 2001, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Ivan Crozier, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Ivan Crozier, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Crozier will be in residence from October 2001 through November 2001.

    Dr. Crozier is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at Unvsity College, London.

    While at the Institute, Dr. Crozier will work on "Pillow Talk: Some Issues of Trust and Credibility in Sexology."

  • Meet Ms. Danna Drori

    October 1, 2001, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Danna Drori, JD, MSt as a Visiting Scholar. Ms. Drori will be in residence from October 1, 2001 through November 1, 2001.

    Ms. Drori is an Assistant United States Attorney with the Southern District of New York.

    Ms. Drori earned a Bachelor of Arts and Juris Doctor from Yale University, and a Master of Studies in women's health from St. John's College at Oxford University. Ms. Drori also completed a clerkship with the Honorable Denise Cote at the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York.

    While at the Institute, Ms. Drori will be working on "Embattled Bodies: Finding Voice in the Medical Context."

  • Meet Dr. Jennifer Greene

    June 1, 2001, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Jennifer Greene, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Greene will be in residence from June 2001 through July 2001.

    Dr. Greene teaches in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Texas. She completed her dissertation in 1994 on "Coercion, Choice and Constraint". Dr. Greene's areas of specialization are ethics, applied ethics, social and political philosophy, and history of philosophy.

    While at the Institute, Dr. Greene will study "Privacy in the Twenty-First Century."

  • Meet Ms. Carroll Blue

    May 1, 2001, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Carroll Parrott Blue, MFAThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Carroll Parrot Blue, MFA as a Visiting Scholar. Ms. Blue will be in residence from May 2001 through June 2001.

    Ms. Blue teaches at the San Diego State University School of Communication. She is an artist who has produced, directed, and written many short and documentary films.

    While at the Institute, Ms. Blue will be working on "Grief Recycled: An Exploration into Death's Impact and the Subsequent Healing of Grief."

  • Meet Dr. Chris Hackler

    February 1, 2001, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Chris Hackler, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Chris Hackler, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Hackler will be in residence from February 2001 through May 2001.

    Dr. Hackler comes to the Institute from the University of Arkansas College of Medicine, Division of Medical Humanities where he is studying the social implications of genetically altering the rate of human aging.

    Dr. Hackler joined the faculty of the UAMS College of Medicine in 1982 as the first director of the new Division of Medical Humanities. He came from East Tennessee State University, where he chaired the Department of Philosophy and taught in the Department of Family Practice.

    After graduating with High Honors from Hendrix College and studying in Germany on a Fulbright Scholarship, he earned a PhD in philosophy from the University of North Carolina. He has also completed fellowships with the Woodrow Wilson Foundation at Brown University and the National Endowment for the Humanities at Indiana University.

    Dr. Hackler was active in the Society for Health and Human Values until it merged in 1998 with two other organizations to form the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH). He was elected Chair of the Association of Faculty in the Medical Humanities in 1991. He served on the governing board of the Society and edited its newsletter Of Value from 1992 to 1998. He received the Society's Distinguished Service Award in 1996.  After the merger, he served as the first editor of ASBH Exchange, a quarterly publication.

    Dr. Hackler has lectured at medical schools and college campuses around the country and abroad. Beginning in 1996, he was a Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow of the Council of Independent Colleges, spending a week each year in residence at participating liberal arts colleges teaching classes in various departments and meeting with faculty and student groups.

    While at the Institute, Dr. Hackler plans to publish a paper establishing the importance of this topic in the medical humanities and a possible grant proposal to fund a multidisciplinary conference on the subject.

  • Meet Dr. Eunice Pollack

    January 1, 2001, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Eunice Pollack, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Pollack will be in residence from January 2001 through April 2001.

    Dr. Pollack earned her Doctorate in American History from Columbia University in 1999 and is working on turning her dissertation into a book.

    While at the Institute, Dr. Pollack will work on this book, "Haunted Households: Angst, Anger, and Eros in American Working-Class and Lower Middle-Class Families, 1900-1970," which explores the psychodynamics of American working-class and lower-middle-class families in the twentieth century.

  • Meet Dr. Julie Reichert

    December 1, 1999, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Julie Reichert, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Julie Reichert, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Reichert will be in residence from December 1999 through April 2000.

    Dr. Reichert is a two-time Academy Award Nominee for Best Feature Documentary for Seeing Red and Union Maids. These films and two others, Growing Up Femaleand Methadone - An American Way Of Dealing, all screened nationally in the U.S. on PBS. Reichert wrote, produced and directed the feature film Emma & Elvis(which screened at numerous international film festivals), and produced (with Steven Bognar) The Dream Catcher, a feature film directed by Ed Radtke. The Dream Catcher has screened in over 20 international film festivals, won numerous awards and is seen on the Sundance Channel.

    Parallel to her filmmaking career, Dr. Reichert has worked for years building the independent film community. Filmmaker Magazine recently named her one of the godmothers of American Independent film. On a national level, Reichert co-founded New Day Films, a distribution co-operative for independent films, and The Film Fund, a foundation that supported the making of social issue media, and which led to the creation of the Independent Feature Project. Reichert is also Professor of Motion Pictures at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio.

    Dr. Reichert has written for the Independent Film & Video Monthly, authored the classic Doing It Yourself, A Handbook on Independent Film Distribution, and a chapter of With Both Eyes Open, Seeing Beyond Gender, edited by Johnson and Kalvern.

    Dr. Reichert's work has received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ohio Arts Council, the American Film Institute, ITVS and several corporations. She has received a Fulbright Fellowship and with Steven Bognar is a Rockefeller Foundation Fellow, and has received support from the Ohio Arts Council and the MacDowell Colony.

    While at the Institute, Dr. Reichert will be teaching a course in the graduate program on Creativity, Meaning, and the End of Life. As a published writer and teacher of creative writing, Dr. Reichert feels strongly that "it is important for the medical community to recognize and support ill and dying people as whole persons rather than as cases or diagnoses."

  • Meet Dr. Monica Maillet

    September 1, 1999, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Monica Maillet, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Maillet will be in residence from September 1999 through December 1999.

    While at the Institute, Dr. Maillet will be working on "Nearing the End of Life Through Performance". She will also present a workshop on "Medicine, Metaphor, and MacBeth" that will look at the subtle ways in which values about health, illness, and the body can often be articulated in cultural texts.

  • Meet Dr. Leigh Turner

    September 1, 1999, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Leigh Turner, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Leigh Turner, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Turner will be in residence from September 1999 through December 1999.

    Dr. Turner is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics and clinical ethicist at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care and Sunnybrook & Women’s College Health Sciences Centre. From 1996-1997 he was a Research Associate at The Hastings Center.

    Dr. Turner earned a Doctorate from the University of Southern California School of Religion and Social Ethics in 1996. His doctoral dissertation explored ethical issues and health policy challenges in multicultural societies.

    While at the Institute, Dr. Turner plans to research "Cultural Diversity, Practical Moral Reasoning, and the Care of the Dying."