Visiting Scholar Announcements

Taylor, Wendell

Meet Dr. Wendell Taylor

We are pleased to welcome Dr. Wendell C. Taylor, Visiting Scholar in the Institute for the Medical Humanities, Department of Preventive Medicine and Population Health. The objectives of his current research proposal are to present a comprehensive overview and analysis of ethics related to hiring practices and workplace interventions for people who smoke or are obese. His research interests are physical activity, workplace health promotion, health equity, and health behaviors in high priority populations.

Dr. Taylor was the principal investigator of a National Institutes of Health grant titled, Booster Breaks: A 21st Century Innovation to Improve Worker Health and Productivity. This study was a cluster-randomized controlled trial of health promoting breaks in the workplace and assessed physical, psychological, and organizational-level outcomes. There are more than 16 peer-reviewed publications related to the Booster Break concept and interventions.

Dr. Taylor received his AB from Grinnell College, MS in Psychology from Eastern Washington University, PhD in Social Psychology from Arizona State University, and his MPH from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health. In addition, he completed a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in Community Health at the Center for Health Promotion Research and Development, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. His previous positions include tenured Associate Professor of Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health, and Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research as well as Adjunct Associate Professor in the Cizik School of Nursing, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

Meet Dr. Minji LeeMinji Lee

Dr. Minji Lee recently received a PhD Degree in the Department of Religion at Rice University. Her PhD thesis, “Bodies of Medieval Women as Dangerous, Liminal, and Holy: Representations in the Writings of Late Medieval Religious Women” explored how this medieval German nun defended the woman’s sexual/reproductive body” as positive in the images of re-creation and salvation against misogynic medieval and religious culture of her age.

Granted that Dr. Lee is a medievalist interested in the interactions between mysticism and medicine in the Middle Ages, she now turns to the new research project to compare medieval European medical theories and modern Korean folk medicine in order to see how women have been striving to maintain their reproductive health and to bring positive meanings to their own bodies. She also participated in making a Korean independent documentary project “For Vagina’s Sake (2017)” to posit how Western pre-modern medicine “diabolized” women’s menstrual body.

Currently, she is also a volunteer at Reunion Institute to promote public awareness in religion.


UPREET DHALIWALMeet Dr. Upreet Dhaliwal

The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Upreet Dhaliwal, MS as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Dhaliwal will be in residence from February 2019 through May 2019.

Dr. Upreet Dhaliwal, formerly Director-Professor of Ophthalmology at the University College of Medical Sciences, University of Delhi, is one of the founding members of the Medical Humanities Group in the Institution.

She is editor of the journal “Research and Humanities in Medical Education (RHiME)” which is an online-only, peer-reviewed, open-access journal, the only journal in Asia that caters specifically to the medical humanities. RHiME can be accessed at www.rhime.in/ojs

An occasional poet, and an avid promoter of medical student-led poetry sessions, Dr Dhaliwal is keen to deepen her involvement with the humanities through the visiting scholar program at the Institute for Medical Humanities. Her work here involves an exploration of the Provider-Patient relationship through the medium of poetry.

  • Meet Dr. Leah DeVun

    September 1, 2008, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Leah DeVun, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Leah DeVun, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. DeVun will be in residence from September 2008 through December 2008.

    Dr. DeVun focuses on the history of science and the history of gender, sex, and sexuality in medieval and early modern Europe. She also studies the legacy of these concepts in the modern world. Her current project is Enter Sex: Science, Hermaphrodites, and the Demands of Difference, which examines the history of sex difference by looking at how scientists and physicians have conceived of biological sex -- particularly through their approaches to intersex -- in the past and present.

    Dr. DeVun is an Assistant Professor of History at Texas A&M University, and she is the author of Prophecy, Alchemy, and the End of Time (forthcoming from Columbia University Press). She also writes about feminism and culture for a number of popular magazines.

    During her fellowship period at the IMH (fall semester of 2008), Dr. DeVun is completing an article entitled “Cures and Closures: Surgery, Intersex, and the Demands of Difference,” which is drawn from a chapter of her book project.

  • Meet Dr. Kenneth Kipnis

    September 1, 2008, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Kenneth Kipnis, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Kenneth Kipnis, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Kipnis will be in residence from September 2008 through May 2009.

    Dr. Kipnis is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. He has written extensively on ethics in health care, including disaster medicine, the treatment of low-birthweight infants, breaching confidentiality, the surgical "normalization" of infants with ambiguous genitalia and the foundations of professional ethics. He has taught medical ethics for over 30 years and has done clinical ethics consultation and expert ethics testimony.

  • Meet Dr. David Adams

    September 1, 2007, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    David M Adams, PhD, MLSThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome David Michael Adams, PhD, MLS as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Adams will be in residence from September 2007 through November 2007.

    During his stay at the Institute, Dr. Adams plans to work on several projects in the area of clinical ethics, each one exploring the role and purpose of “ethicists” and of ethics consultation in the clinical setting. One project investigats the role of consensus formation as a way of imparting moral authority to the process of ethics consultation, while another critically examins claims that philosophical methods of analysis have a distinctive role to play in resolving moral dilemmas at the bedside. A third project in the history of bioethics argues for a revised understanding of the moral demands in medical practice which brought philosophers, theologians, and other “outsiders” into the clinic, and from which contemporary “bioethics” is said to have emerged.

    Dr. Adams is a graduate of the University of California at Berkeley, the University of Washington, and Stanford University. He is currently doing graduate work in bioethics and health policy at Loyola University of Chicago.

  • Meet Dr. Rebecca Laroche

    January 1, 2007, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Rebecca Laroche, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Rebecca Laroche, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Laroche will be in residence from January 2007 through August 2007.

    During her time with the Institute, Dr. Laroche plans to complete her current book manuscript, Herbal Rhetoric: Englishwomen's Texts and Medical Authority, 1550-1650.

    Dr. Laroche's research in part demonstrates that women in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries owned large and expensive volumes of medical texts and wrote on and about these texts with authority. In addition to UTMB's support of this portion of her work, the entire project on women's writing in the context of herbal practice has received support from the Huntington, Folger Shakespeare, and Yale Beinecke Libraries.

    In addition to work on her book, Dr. Laroche plans to work with graduate students in their research interests, she also will present two papers, "'Helpes in their own fieldes and gardens': Women's ownership of English herbals, 1550-1700" and "Rosemary, Roses, and Borage: One woman's herbalism in seventeenth-century England."

  • Meet Dr. Jurate Sakalys

    March 1, 2006, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex
    The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Jurate Sakalys, PhD, RN as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Sakalys will be in residence from March 2006 through April 2006.
  • Meet Dr. Petra Kuppers

    January 1, 2006, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex
    The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Petra Kuppers, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Kuppers will be in residence in 2006.
  • Meet Dr. Suzanne Poirier

    January 1, 2006, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex
    The UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Suzanne Poirier, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Poirier will be in residence from January 1, 2006 through April 30, 2006.
  • Meet Dr. Meredith Raimondo

    September 1, 2005, 00:00 AM by Julia Essex

    Meredith Raimondo, PhDThe UTMB Health Institute for the Medical Humanities is pleased to welcome Meredith Raimondo, PhD as a Visiting Scholar. Dr. Raimondo will be in residence from September 2005 through January 2006.

    Dr. Raimondois an Assistant Professor of Comparative American Studies at Oberlin College. She is working on a manuscript which uses theoretical frameworks from media studies, cultural geography, and the history of public health explore representations of the geography of the AIDS epidemic in the United States. It traces the contours and shifting scale of narratives that track the gendered and racialized movement of HIV around the globe and within the nation, from research into its “origin” to its movement in rural areas. In addition, Dr. Raimondo is working on an essay which analyzes photographs of President Bush's 2002 trip to five African nations to think through human rights and the militarization of global health discourse.