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UTMB Obstetrics & Gynecology NEWSROOM

4/10/2019  

Mentoring Researchers WorksFrom Internal OB Newsletter

ROM
Maged Costantine, MD Associate Professor

Our OBGYN department has been very successful in mentoring MFM fellows and junior faculty, and in encouraging and promoting their research proposals. Recently, Dr. Costantine and his colleagues have been working on the use of statins to prevent preeclampsia in high-risk pregnant women. This condition causes significant risk to mother and baby in both the short and long term. Because preeclampsia shares many features with cardiovascular disease, the drugs used to treat cardiovascular disease may be beneficial for women at risk of developing preeclampsia. For example, aspirin is currently recommended to reduce the risk of recurrence of preeclampsia in women at high risk, similarly it has protected many cardiovascular patients. However, the use of statins still needs to be more thoroughly explored. Here at UTMB OBGYN, our researchers are doing just that. They are exploring the use of pravastatin and so far, it appears to be beneficial in studies with mice, small animals and even in a small pilot study in pregnant women. It's benefits still need to be investigated in a larger randomized trial. But the success looks promising and we applaud the efforts of our UTMB team along with all the Perinatal Research Division. You can find out more about their work here and here. Of course, all of this would not be possible without the support the chair of the Ob/Gyn department, Dr. Gary Hankins.

4/16/2018

Poor sleep quality during menopause tied to increased inflammation From MDAlert

ROMAssistant Professor

Sara Nowakowski, PhD

New research investigates how the sleep troubles experienced by many women going through menopause increases inflammation within their bodies. This inflammation has been linked with high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease. UTMB’s Sara Nowakowski, the study’s lead author said, “I really think this study drives home the point that we need to consider disturbed sleep a significant health risk factor just like we do for diet and physical activity.” The study finding has also been reported at Netscape Health and CompuServe.

1/18/2018  

Here's what you need to know about treating a UTI while pregnant From SELF

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Associate Professor

Shannon Clark, MD

UTMB's Shannon Clark discusses treating UTI's while pregnant in this very informative article. UTI's are common during pregnancy, and if left untreated can cause serious issues, so treatment is important. But, a recent CDC report found that women are still being treated with antibiotics that have been linked to birth defects. However, some research findings indicate the potential risks are minimal. Clark says it is important for doctors to weigh the risks and benefits of a drug before prescribing it.

10/11/2017  

Talk therapy may help menopause woesFrom UPIHealthyDay News

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Assistant Professor

Sara Nowakowski, PhD

Insomnia and depression are common problems among menopausal women. New research conducted by UTMB’s Sara Nowakowski found that cognitive behavioral therapy not only eases insomnia but also lead to clinically meaningful improvements in depressive symptoms. “It’s not that surprising that an insomnia intervention would reduce insomnia, but the strong effects on depressive symptoms was surprising,” said Nowakowski. Study findings were presented at the North American Menopause society annual meeting in Philadelphia. This news also reported at MDalert, Sleep Review, Health Medicine Network, Science Newsline, Medical Xpress, Gears of Biz, Healio Endocrine Today, Ob.Gyn.News and Medpage Today.

9/20/2017

Oxidative stress produces damage linked with increased risk of preterm birth

ROM
Associate Professor

Ramkumar Menon, PhD

A group of scientists led by Ramkumar Menon at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have gained new insights into what factors lead to preterm birth. This study is currently available in The American Journal of Pathology. When a woman is pregnant, the amniotic membranes serve important developmental and protective functions for the growing fetus. As a woman nears the end of her pregnancy, the amniotic sac develops fractures and eventually ruptures, causing her water to break.”

...more...

11/13/2014  

Common cholesterol-fighting drug may prevent hysterectomies in women with uterine fibroids

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Assistant Professor
Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgeon

Mostafa Borahay, MD, FACOG

“Non-cancerous uterine fibroids are the most common type of tumor in the female reproductive system, accounting for half of the 600,000 hysterectomies done annually in the U.S. Their estimated annual cost is up to $34 billion in the U.S. alone,” said UTMB’s Dr. Mostafa Borahay, assistant professor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology and lead author. “Despite this, the exact cause of these tumors is not well understood, as there are several genetic, familial and hormonal abnormalities linked with their development.” ...more..

10/27/2014  

TPA 2014 Outstanding Contribution to Public Service

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Professor
Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology
Jeff Temple, PhD

Join us in congratulating Dr. Jeff Temple, Ph.D.
He has recently been selected as the TPA 2014 Outstanding Contribution to Public Service Award Recipient. This honor will be presented to him at the annual conference in Dallas November 14, 2014.


10/27/2014
 

Teen hormones and cellphones

ROM
Jeff Temple, PhD

The study results indicate that sexting may precede sexual intercourse in some cases and further cements the idea that sexting behavior is a credible sign of teenage sexual activity. Further, the researchers did not find a link between sexting and risky sexual behavior over time, which may suggest that sexting is becoming a part of growing up. ...more...

Professor
Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology

10/27/2014
 

Researcher of the MonthApril/May 2014

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Sara Nowakowski, PhD

Join us in congratulating Dr. Sara Nowakowski, Ph.D.
Her research is focused on improving women's health and examining interventions for insomnia and nocturnal hot flashes for peri- and postmenopausal women. In addition she has received a grant to expand this research to expand the effects of the interventions on depressive symptoms among peri and postmenopausal women...More

Assistant Professor
Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology

5/27/2014
 

Researcher of the MonthApril/May 2014

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Sathish Kumar, DVM, PhD

Join us in congratulating Dr. Sathish Kumar, Ph.D.. He and his team are working to understand the mechanisms of normal cardiovascular adaptations of pregnancy as well as the mechanisms of impaired vascular responses in women with preeclampsia. Read more in the Researcher of the Month profile....

Assistant Professor
Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology

3/21/2014
 

Researcher of the MonthFebruary 2014

ROM
Maged M. Costantine, MD

Associate Professor
Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology

Join us in congratulating Dr.Costantine and his team. They are working to introduce statins as agents to prevent preeclampsia in high risk pregnant women. Read more in the Researcher of the Month profile....

Associate Professor
Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology

2/28/2014
 

National Advisory Child Health and Human Development Council

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George Saade, MD

Professor
Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology

Join us in congratulating Dr. George Saade on his recent appointment to the National Advisory Child Health and Human Development Council (NICHD)  at the National Institute of Health.

The NICHD strives to ensure all babies are born healthy and wanted, women are safe during reproductive processes, and that all children achieve their full potential for healthy and productive lives, free from disease or disability, and finally to enable the health, productivity, independence, and well-being of all people through optimal rehabilitation.

The NICHD was created in 1962, at the request of the US president with the support of Congress. Since then, the NICHD has achieved impressive scientific advances in its efforts to enhance lives through every stages of human development. Research supported and conducted by the NICHD has helped to explain the unique health needs of many, and has brought about novel and effective ways to fulfill them.