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Pharmacology & Toxicology Course Offerings 2016-2017

Fall

Lab Rotation PHTO (6022)
The objectives of this course are to acquaint students with the research activities of individual faculty members and to assist students in choosing their areas of specialization. The faculty member and student will design a research project and work out a time schedule committing the student to three to 24 hours per week in the laboratory. The student will prepare an abstract describing the objectives and methodology of the study and then conduct the study under the faculty memberÆs supervision. A final report stating the methods, results, interpretation, problems encountered, and suggestions for future research will be required. In addition to carrying out the research proposal the student will be expected to gain a knowledge of the current literature relevant to the project. Grading will be based on the studentÆs laboratory performance, final written report, and an oral presentation of the project. Grading will be A, B, C, F. Normally, a student entering the program without an advanced degree will be required to complete 12 hours of credit with a grade of B or better prior to gaining admission to candidacy. Individual requirements may vary depending on the research experience of the student. Prerequisites: None Terms offered: I, II, III Year offered: Annually Hours per week: Laboratory 3 24

Research (PHTO 6097)
Research on thesis or dissertation project under the direction of supervising professor. The research is graded as satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U). Prerequisites: None Term offered: I, II, III Year offered: Annually Hours per week: Laboratory 3 27

Thesis (PHTO 6098)
Formal research and writing leading to the preparation and completion of the thesis for the Master of Science degree under the direction of the studentÆs supervisory committee. Grading will be based upon the studentÆs level of performance as reported by the chairperson of the studentÆs supervisory committee and will be assigned as satisfactory or unsatisfactory. Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy for the masterÆs degree Term offered: I, II, III Year offered: Annually Hours per week: Variable Students registering for Thesis are expected to register for a total of 9 credit hours per term.

Dissertation (PHTO 6099)
Formal research and writing leading to the preparation and completion of the dissertation for the Doctor of Philosophy degree under the direction of the studentÆs supervisory committee. Grading will be based upon the studentÆs level of performance as reported by the chairperson of the studentÆs supervisory committee and will be assigned as satisfactory or unsatisfactory. Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree Terms offered: I, II, III Year offered: Annually Hours per week: Variable Students registering for Dissertation are expected to register for a total of 9 credit hours per term.

Addiction Sciences and Neurotherapeutics (PHTO 6120)
This course will provide an interactive workgroup for trainees to discuss their research in addiction science with graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty. Emphasis will be placed on therapeutic development, and trainees will learn how to approach existing projects with a therapeutic development prospective. Presentation formats will vary in scope and level of analysis, depending on the needs of the trainee. Examples of trainee presentation formats include: expansion of an existing project for grant proposal development, and detailed discussion of data analysis and interpretation. Intermittently, faculty will present information on their research program to provide students with an overview of cutting-edge neuroscience and drug discovery/development topics. Grades will be based on in-class participation and presentation quality.

Neuroaddicts Journal Club (PHTO 6121)
The Neuroaddicts Journal Club provides a more cohesive venue for trainees and exposes mentees to a wider range of neuroscience and addictions topics. The goals are for mentees to learn critical thinking of the published literature, the requirements and construction of high quality manuscripts, and presentation skills. Within this environment, mentees have a prime opportunity to refine the ability to converse in both scientific and collegial domains, and become comfortable with asking questions and thinking critical/constructively. 

Advances in Mental Health Research (PHTO 6123)
This course will provide a solid understanding of current mental health research and promote understanding of factors advancing future groundbreaking mental health research.  The course will have flexible format, including sessions where students discuss relevant papers, present their own data, discuss a wide range of career-development issues, learn about pharmacotherapeutic development, learn advanced grant-writing principles, discuss relevant ethical issues, and learn advanced research techniques.  Attendance 50%, participation in classroom discussion 50%.  A satisfactory grade requires a score of 80%. 

Pharmacology & Toxicology Std Journal Cl (PHTO 6190)
This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to practice formal presentation skills and discuss science. Students will select research articles from pharmacological journals for presentation to students and student groups. Each student will present and discuss at least one paper per semester depending on the number of students enrolled in the course. Grades will be based on attendance and quality of presentation. Pharmacology students are required to be enrolled in this course every term offered, except for the last term.

Seminar in Pharmacology & Toxicology (PHTO 6195)
Presentations by guest lecturers, staff, and students on the progress of their own research, as well as review of recent advances in pharmacology. Students will receive a grade of satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U) based on attendance and participation. Prerequisites: Students are required to be enrolled in this course every term offered, except for the last term.

New Drug Development (PHTO 6219)
This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the drug discovery and development process, focusing on drug development science, regulation, and industry.  Students will learn how promising new drugs are discovered, screened, and evaluated from the standpoint of their safety and efficacy.

How drug commercialization decisions are made at each major phase in the drug development process.  How information technology is used to increase drug development productivity as well as enhance the commercial potential of drug candidates.  Topics include:  Molecules to medicines; Drug discovery, design, and screening; Early testing and Safety; Clinical research; Global drug review and approval, Trends and issues in pharmaceutical drug development; Case history, etc.  The course grade will be based on class participation (50%) and class project and presentation (50%).  Term offered: Fall, Year offered:  Annually.  Hours per week: Lecture, conference and discussion 4.  Faculty: Zhou, Staff.

Intro Tox Risk Assessment (PHTO 6224)
The objective of this course is to provide a basic foundation on the toxicological risk assessment process. The course format is lecture-based with supplement from online materials and experiences, as well as practical application aligned with book chapter commentary, and case studies.  Students will be provided a risk assessment simulation exercise to experience and understand the risk assessment process. Within this course, students learn about: 1) the building blocks of risk assessment, 2) the risk assessment process, 3) how risk assessment is applied and used in decision making scenarios, 4) current and emerging issues in risk assessment, and 5) the skills and professional resources available to those interested in risk assessment. After completing the course, the student will be able to: 1) define and explain toxicological risk assessment, 2) comprehend the application of risk assessment, 3) demonstrate effective use of risk assessment technique, 4) demonstrate competent science and math skills associated with risk assessment, 5) employ ethical principles in the application of risk assessment, 6) demonstrate the ability to work effectively in teams and in discussion-based format. Course performance grading will be standard letter grades, based on exams, individual projects, class participation/discussion, and attendance.

Autonomic, Cardiovascular and Central Nervous System Pharmacology (PHTO 6312)
This fifteen-week course serves as an introduction to the cellular, biochemical, and molecular effects of pharmacological agents acting on the autonomic and central nervous systems as well as the cardiovascular and renal systems.  Prior to detailed presentations of the various classes of agents used to treat disorders of the aforementioned systems, the pertinent physiology of each system will be reviewed.  The therapeutic use, mechanism of action, adverse effects, and absorption, distribution, and metabolism will be emphasized for each pharmacological agent presented in class.  This course will be graded on the basis of four in-class examinations.

Genome-Wide Analytical Technologies for Biomedical Research (PHTO 6318)
New developments in technologies such as proteomics, metabolomics, epigenetics, and molecular imaging are expanding our knowledge of the biological world at a rapid pace. These analytical approaches and expertise are accessible at UTMB. The student is offered education in cutting-edge technologies for application in biomedicine. The course is a blend of lectures, literature seminars, and practical demonstrations of data acquisition and data analysis. At the end of the course, the student will be able to identify and apply experimental strategies that best fit their biomedical experimental hypothesis. Grading: The examination will consist of a 5 page research proposal that describes the application of genome-wide technologies to a biomedical hypothesis. The exam will effectively integrate the student's working knowledge of materials discussed in seminars, lectures and practical demonstrations.

Principles of Environmental Toxicology (PHTO 6319)
This course will be a graduate-level presentation of fundamental principles of environmental toxicology, including basic concepts like ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion), mechanisms of toxicity and injury, inflammation and ROS, overviews of discipline-specific toxicology (e.g., genetic toxicology, immunotoxicology, and toxicant-associated carcinogenesis), as well as organ-system-based toxicology covering major organ systems of the body (e.g., neurotoxicology, hepatotoxicology, renal toxicology, cardiovascular toxicology, and respiratory toxicology), and including developmental toxicology. Grades will be calculated based on upon 2 mid-term and final in-class exams, and class attendance.

Spring

Lab Rotation PHTO (6022)
The objectives of this course are to acquaint students with the research activities of individual faculty members and to assist students in choosing their areas of specialization. The faculty member and student will design a research project and work out a time schedule committing the student to three to 24 hours per week in the laboratory. The student will prepare an abstract describing the objectives and methodology of the study and then conduct the study under the faculty memberÆs supervision. A final report stating the methods, results, interpretation, problems encountered, and suggestions for future research will be required. In addition to carrying out the research proposal the student will be expected to gain a knowledge of the current literature relevant to the project. Grading will be based on the studentÆs laboratory performance, final written report, and an oral presentation of the project. Grading will be A, B, C, F. Normally, a student entering the program without an advanced degree will be required to complete 12 hours of credit with a grade of B or better prior to gaining admission to candidacy. Individual requirements may vary depending on the research experience of the student. Prerequisites: None Terms offered: I, II, III Year offered: Annually Hours per week: Laboratory 3 24 

Research (PHTO 6097)
Research on thesis or dissertation project under the direction of supervising professor. The research is graded as satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U). Prerequisites: None Term offered: I, II, III Year offered: Annually Hours per week: Laboratory 3 27

Thesis (PHTO 6098)
Formal research and writing leading to the preparation and completion of the thesis for the Master of Science degree under the direction of the studentÆs supervisory committee. Grading will be based upon the studentÆs level of performance as reported by the chairperson of the studentÆs supervisory committee and will be assigned as satisfactory or unsatisfactory. Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy for the masterÆs degree Term offered: I, II, III Year offered: Annually Hours per week: Variable Students registering for Thesis are expected to register for a total of 9 credit hours per term.

Dissertation(PHTO 6099)
Formal research and writing leading to the preparation and completion of the dissertation for the Doctor of Philosophy degree under the direction of the studentÆs supervisory committee. Grading will be based upon the studentÆs level of performance as reported by the chairperson of the studentÆs supervisory committee and will be assigned as satisfactory or unsatisfactory. Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree Terms offered: I, II, III Year offered: Annually Hours per week: Variable Students registering for Dissertation are expected to register for a total of 9 credit hours per term.

Addiction Sciences and Neurotherapeutics (PHTO 6120)
This course will provide an interactive workgroup for trainees to discuss their research in addiction science with graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty. Emphasis will be placed on therapeutic development, and trainees will learn how to approach existing projects with a therapeutic development prospective. Presentation formats will vary in scope and level of analysis, depending on the needs of the trainee. Examples of trainee presentation formats include: expansion of an existing project for grant proposal development, and detailed discussion of data analysis and interpretation. Intermittently, faculty will present information on their research program to provide students with an overview of cutting-edge neuroscience and drug discovery/development topics. Grades will be based on in-class participation and presentation quality.

Neuroaddicts Journal Club (PHTO 6121)
The Neuroaddicts Journal Club provides a more cohesive venue for trainees and exposes mentees to a wider range of neuroscience and addictions topics. The goals are for mentees to learn critical thinking of the published literature, the requirements and construction of high quality manuscripts, and presentation skills. Within this environment, mentees have a prime opportunity to refine the ability to converse in both scientific and collegial domains, and become comfortable with asking questions and thinking critical/constructively. 

Advances in Mental Health Research (PHTO 6123)
This course will provide a solid understanding of current mental health research and promote understanding of factors advancing future groundbreaking mental health research.  The course will have flexible format, including sessions where students discuss relevant papers, present their own data, discuss a wide range of career-development issues, learn about pharmacotherapeutic development, learn advanced grant-writing principles, discuss relevant ethical issues, and learn advanced research techniques.  Attendance 50%, participation in classroom discussion 50%.  A satisfactory grade requires a score of 80%. 

Pharmacology & Toxicology Std JournalCl (PHTO 6190)
This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to practice formal presentation skills and discuss science. Students will select research articles from pharmacological journals for presentation to students and student groups. Each student will present and discuss at least one paper per semester depending on the number of students enrolled in the course. Grades will be based on attendance and quality of presentation. Pharmacology students are required to be enrolled in this course every term offered, except for the last term.

Seminar in Pharmacology & Toxicology (PHTO 6195)
Presentations by guest lecturers, staff, and students on the progress of their own research, as well as review of recent advances in pharmacology. Students will receive a grade of satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U) based on attendance and participation. Prerequisites: Students are required to be enrolled in this course every term offered, except for the last term.

Synthetic Methods to Biomolecules (PHTO 6211)
Modern methods for the synthesis of biomolecules will be covered. Biomolecules include various natural products, unnatural amino acids, peptides, nucleotides, carbohydrates, bioactive small molecular chemical probes and drug candidates. The lecture topics will include modern synthetic methods that are useful to access various biomolecules. These synthetic methods include but not limit to solid phase synthesis, combinatorial synthesis, and fundamental organic synthetic approaches such as reductions, oxidations, functional group protections, carbon-carbon bond formation, asymmetric alkylation, asymmetric allylation, metal-halogen exchange, organolithium reagents, directed ortho metalation, Stille reaction, Suzuki reaction, Heck reaction, stereoselective aldol reaction, olefination, asymmetric epoxidation and catalytic epoxide-opening reactions, asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction, olefin metathesis, synthetic methods for heterocyclic compounds, etc.

Endocrine, Chemotherapy, and Toxicology Pharmacology (PHTO 6213)
Survey of Pharmacology course covering drugs that affect the endocrine system, drugs used in cancer chemotherapy, anti-parasitic drugs, drugs to treat gastrointestinal (GI) system, anti-dhistomines, anti-inflammatory drugs and an introduction to toxicology and specific toxic agents

Summer


Lab Rotation PHTO (6022)
The objectives of this course are to acquaint students with the research activities of individual faculty members and to assist students in choosing their areas of specialization. The faculty member and student will design a research project and work out a time schedule committing the student to three to 24 hours per week in the laboratory. The student will prepare an abstract describing the objectives and methodology of the study and then conduct the study under the faculty memberÆs supervision. A final report stating the methods, results, interpretation, problems encountered, and suggestions for future research will be required. In addition to carrying out the research proposal the student will be expected to gain a knowledge of the current literature relevant to the project. Grading will be based on the studentÆs laboratory performance, final written report, and an oral presentation of the project. Grading will be A, B, C, F. Normally, a student entering the program without an advanced degree will be required to complete 12 hours of credit with a grade of B or better prior to gaining admission to candidacy. Individual requirements may vary depending on the research experience of the student. Prerequisites: None Terms offered: I, II, III Year offered: Annually Hours per week: Laboratory 3 24

Research (PHTO 6097)
Research on thesis or dissertation project under the direction of supervising professor. The research is graded as satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U). Prerequisites: None Term offered: I, II, III Year offered: Annually Hours per week: Laboratory 3 27

Thesis (PHTO 6098)
Formal research and writing leading to the preparation and completion of the thesis for the Master of Science degree under the direction of the studentÆs supervisory committee. Grading will be based upon the studentÆs level of performance as reported by the chairperson of the studentÆs supervisory committee and will be assigned as satisfactory or unsatisfactory. Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy for the masterÆs degree Term offered: I, II, III Year offered: Annually Hours per week: Variable Students registering for Thesis are expected to register for a total of 9 credit hours per term.

Dissertation (PHTO 6099)
Formal research and writing leading to the preparation and completion of the dissertation for the Doctor of Philosophy degree under the direction of the studentÆs supervisory committee. Grading will be based upon the studentÆs level of performance as reported by the chairperson of the studentÆs supervisory committee and will be assigned as satisfactory or unsatisfactory. Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree Terms offered: I, II, III Year offered: Annually Hours per week: Variable Students registering for Dissertation are expected to register for a total of 9 credit hours per term.

Advances in Mental Health Research (PHTO 6123)
This course will provide a solid understanding of current mental health research and promote understanding of factors advancing future groundbreaking mental health research.  The course will have flexible format, including sessions where students discuss relevant papers, present their own data, discuss a wide range of career-development issues, learn about pharmacotherapeutic development, learn advanced grant-writing principles, discuss relevant ethical issues, and learn advanced research techniques.  Attendance 50%, participation in classroom discussion 50%.  A satisfactory grade requires a score of 80%. 

Seminar in Pharmacology & Toxicology (PHTO 6195)
Presentations by guest lecturers, staff, and students on the progress of their own research, as well as review of recent advances in pharmacology. Students will receive a grade of satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U) based on attendance and participation. Prerequisites: Students are required to be enrolled in this course every term offered, except for the last term.