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Monique Pappadis, MEd, PhD 2019-2020 Texas RCMAR Scholar


Visit Dr. Pappadis's web bio at the Division of Rehabilitation Sciences.

Life-space mobility, readmission, and mortality following stroke in Mexican Americans

Mentors: Soham Al Snih, MD, PhD and Kenneth Ottenbacher, PhD

Mexican Americans have an increased risk of stroke in comparison to non-Hispanic Whites and report worse cognitive, functional, and neurological outcomes following stroke. It is well established that older adults with greater levels of mobility are likely to have lower rates of re-admissions and decreased mortality. Spatial mobility was initially conceptualized as ‘life space’, the space in which a person travels/moves over a specific time point. However, the initial assessment excluded the need for assistance. The Life-Space Mobility Assessment (LSA), developed at University of Alabama Birmingham, is a validated measure of community mobility in older adults during the 4 weeks prior to assessment. In addition, LSA accounts for assistance needed from a device or person. Using data from the Hispanic EPESE wave 7 (2010-2011) on Mexican Americans, the majority had restricted life-space, with nearly 80% limited to their home or neighborhood. To date, no study has identified the role of life space mobility as a potential protective factor in determining discharge destination, 30-day re-admission, and mortality following a stroke.


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