The Newsroom    Published Wednesday, Apr. 28, 2010, 4:55 PM
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Experts to discuss blast-induced brain injuries at Galveston conference

The tenth annual Galveston Brain Injury Conference, set for May 5-7 at Moody Gardens, will focus on the diagnosis, treatment and mechanisms of  blast-induced brain injury.

The conference is an invitational event sponsored by the Center for Rehabilitation Sciences and the School of Health Professions at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston in collaboration with the Transitional Learning Center in Galveston. The TLC is a residential rehabilitation and treatment center that provides comprehensive services for persons who have suffered acute brain injuries.

“Blast-induced brain injury is the signature injury of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, and it is our hope that the conference will enhance collaborative relationships and continue to encourage much needed research on evaluation, treatment and recovery,” said Elizabeth Protas, vice president and dean of the UTMB School of Health Professions.

On Thursday, Dr. Brent Masel, TLC president and medical director, will deliver the welcome address and introductions, and UTMB professor Douglas DeWitt will provide an overview of the issues to be discussed by the 46 experts invited to the conference.

Also on Thursday, Sureyya Dikmen, professor in the department of rehabilitation medicine at the University of Washington, will receive the 2010 Robert L. Moody Prize for Distinguished Initiatives in Brain Injury Research and Rehabilitation. Dr. David L. Callender, president of UTMB, will present the award.

The award recognizes Dikmen for her work in advancing clinical research in the field of traumatic brain injury. She has devoted her career as a neuropsychologist to the study of TBI with emphasis on the consequences of traumatic brain injury and clinical trials to reduce the negative effects of these injuries.

The Moody Prize was created by UTMB to recognize distinguished contributions in brain injury rehabilitation and research. The prize consists of an honorarium of $10,000, an inscribed plaque and crystal pyramid that commemorates the award, and a framed certificate signed by the members of the governing board.

 

 

 




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