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    Shining new light on halting the progression of Alzheimer's disease

    March 19, 2018, 19:16 PM by Donna Ramirez
    A light that is barely visible to the human eye could be the key to stopping the terrible effects of Alzheimer’s disease. A new UTMB study shows that using near infrared light on the heads of mice can effectively reduce vulnerability to the damaging effects of a toxic chemical in the brain known to be involved with the onset of Alzheimer’s.
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    UTMB establishes institute to lead research, development of vaccines

    February 23, 2018, 16:20 PM by Raul Reyes
    Vaccine research and development will expand at UTMB with the creation of the Sealy Institute for Vaccine Sciences. The institute, supported by The Sealy & Smith Foundation and approved by The University of Texas System, will help fund and further guide the development of preventive and therapeutic vaccines at UTMB.
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    Research Briefs

    February 23, 2018, 16:20 PM by User Not Found
    UTMB’s Dr. Scott Weaver was named as a Fellow by the National Academy of Inventors and will be inducted into the academy on April 5, 2018 during its annual conference in Washington, D.C. Weaver, globally recognized for his expertise in mosquito-borne diseases, is the director of the UTMB Institute for Human Infections and Immunity and scientific director of the Galveston National Laboratory.
  • Dr. Jeff Temple

    Children who get spanked more likely to be violent toward future dating partners

    January 25, 2018, 13:30 PM by Christopher Smith Gonzalez
    A parent who spanks a child may be teaching them the wrong lesson. A new study by UTMB researchers found a link between children who experience corporal punishment and those who later perpetrate acts of dating violence.
  • Research - Weight loss

    Research Briefs

    January 25, 2018, 13:30 PM by Donna Ramirez
    Scientists at UTMB have discovered a promising developing drug that has been shown to selectively shrink excess fat by increasing fat cell metabolism. The drug significantly reduces body weight and blood cholesterol levels without lowering food intake in obese mice.
  • Hip

    UTMB to study new approach for hip fracture recovery

    December 20, 2017, 09:08 AM by Kurt Koopmann
    A multimillion dollar grant could help researchers develop a novel therapeutic for women recovering from hip fractures. UTMB is part of a consortium of seven universities that has received $15.6 million from the National Institute on Aging for a multisite clinical trial to study the use of testosterone therapy and exercise in post-menopausal women recovering from hip fracture.
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    Research Briefs

    December 20, 2017, 09:08 AM by Donna Ramirez
    Frequent alcohol consumption kills new brain cells in adults, with females being more vulnerable, according to new research at UTMB. Led by Dr. Ping Wu, professor in the Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, the researchers discovered that alcohol killed the stem cells in adult mouse brains. Because brain stem cells are responsible for creating new nerve cells and are important to maintaining normal cognitive function, this study could open a door to combating chronic alcoholism.
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    Oxidative stress produces damage linked with increased risk of preterm birth

    November 20, 2017, 11:16 AM by Donna Ramirez
    A group of scientists led by Dr. Ramkumar Menon at UTMB have gained new insights into what factors lead to preterm birth. These findings could help pregnant women decrease their risk.
  • Dr. Joan Nichols and Dr. Joaquin Cortiella look at an example of a bioreactor pouch that contains lung progenitor and stem cells and pieces of lung scaffolding, similar to those sent to space in August.

    Out of this world research: UTMB and Houston Methodist research project sends lungs to space, could lead to new therapeutics

    October 24, 2017, 17:24 PM by Shannon Porter
    Growing up during an era with an active space program, Dr. Joan Nichols and Dr. Joaquin Cortiella were fascinated by space. Now, she and Cortiella, a professor and physician in the Department of Anesthesiology at UTMB, are having the chance to live a childhood dream.
  • Jamail Student Center

    Passing the test: Emergency planning ensured safety of students, preserved research mission

    October 2, 2017, 11:55 AM by Alexis Loyd
    The start of the 2017-2018 academic year was a memorable one for UTMB students and faculty. Just days after welcoming new students from all schools to campus at fall orientation, leaders in UTMB’s Academic Enterprise had the safety of students, faculty and staff in mind when they decided to cancel classes as Hurricane Harvey closed in on the Texas gulf coast.
  • Vaccine Needle Spread

    New Zika vaccine protects fetus against infection and birth defects

    August 18, 2017, 05:55 AM by Donna Ramirez
    Immunizing female mice with a Zika vaccine can protect their developing fetus from infection and birth defects during pregnancy, according to new UTMB research. The UTMB study is the first to demonstrate that potential vaccines could protect a fetus from the Zika virus.
  • Asthma inhaler

    Research Briefs

    August 18, 2017, 05:55 AM by User Not Found
    Managing asthma in adults can be tricky because the condition can stem from several causes and treatment often depends on what is triggering the asthma. A team of experts from UTMB examined and summarized the current information available from many different sources on diagnosing and managing mild to moderate asthma in adults.
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    New cancer drug makes commonly prescribed chemo drug more effective when given together

    July 17, 2017, 09:22 AM by Donna Ramirez
    Researchers have found a way to increase the effectiveness of a widely used cancer drug while decreasing the risk of heart-damaging side effects, according to a new study by researchers from UTMB and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center.
  • Cell

    Research Briefs

    July 17, 2017, 09:22 AM by User Not Found
    Researchers at UTMB may hold the answer to preventing premature cell death. According to Dr. Ken Fujise, head of UTMB’s cardiology division, the key finding of new research is that the protein fortilin plays a role in the death of cells that could help fight cancer or help preserve an organ that will be used in a transplant.
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    Pregnant women unaware how Zika virus can spread, survey finds

    June 20, 2017, 06:16 AM by Christopher Smith Gonzalez
    Pregnant women at risk of Zika virus infection may not be aware of the various ways the virus is spread or be taking the proper preventive measures. A survey conducted by UTMB researchers focused on pregnant women in Southeast Texas.
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    Advancing health through animal research: New website aims to inform employees and public about animal research at UTMB

    May 22, 2017, 07:55 AM by KirstiAnn Clifford
    When you take medication or get a vaccine or chemotherapy, chances are you’re able to do so because of animal research. In fact, most of the major medical advances in the last century were made possible through the help of laboratory animals.
  • MSrisk

    Researchers find new gene interaction associated with increased MS risk

    April 20, 2017, 12:50 PM by Christopher Smith Gonzalez
    A person carrying variants of two particular genes could be almost three times more likely to develop multiple sclerosis, according to the latest findings from scientists at UTMB and Duke University Medical Center.
  • Vials

    Research Briefs

    April 20, 2017, 12:50 PM by User Not Found
    New research led by Dr. Fangjian Guo, assistant professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at UTMB, suggests that the increase in women receiving BRCA gene testing may not necessarily mean better diagnosis of those at risk of certain types of cancer.
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    UTMB anesthesiologist develops smart system to monitor patient oxygen levels, improve lung function

    March 16, 2017, 10:02 AM by Christopher Smith Gonzalez
    Sometimes, it’s the algorithm that knows best. Dr. Michael Kinsky, a professor in UTMB’s Department of Anesthesiology, has developed a device that can monitor a patient’s oxygen levels and alert medical staff when levels drop and the patient is at risk for pulmonary distress.
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    Research Briefs

    March 16, 2017, 10:01 AM by Donna Ramirez
    Dr. Ping Wu, PhD, professor of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, and Nikos Vasilakis, PhD, associate professor of Pathology, have uncovered the mechanisms that the Zika virus uses to alter brain development.