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    Pregnant women unaware how Zika virus can spread, survey finds

    June 20, 2017, 06:16 AM by Christopher Smith Gonzalez
    Pregnant women at risk of Zika virus infection may not be aware of the various ways the virus is spread or be taking the proper preventive measures. A survey conducted by UTMB researchers focused on pregnant women in Southeast Texas.
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    Advancing health through animal research: New website aims to inform employees and public about animal research at UTMB

    May 22, 2017, 07:55 AM by KirstiAnn Clifford
    When you take medication or get a vaccine or chemotherapy, chances are you’re able to do so because of animal research. In fact, most of the major medical advances in the last century were made possible through the help of laboratory animals.
  • MSrisk

    Researchers find new gene interaction associated with increased MS risk

    April 20, 2017, 12:50 PM by Christopher Smith Gonzalez
    A person carrying variants of two particular genes could be almost three times more likely to develop multiple sclerosis, according to the latest findings from scientists at UTMB and Duke University Medical Center.
  • Vials

    Research Briefs

    April 20, 2017, 12:50 PM by KirstiAnn Clifford
    New research led by Dr. Fangjian Guo, assistant professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at UTMB, suggests that the increase in women receiving BRCA gene testing may not necessarily mean better diagnosis of those at risk of certain types of cancer.
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    UTMB anesthesiologist develops smart system to monitor patient oxygen levels, improve lung function

    March 16, 2017, 10:02 AM by Christopher Smith Gonzalez
    Sometimes, it’s the algorithm that knows best. Dr. Michael Kinsky, a professor in UTMB’s Department of Anesthesiology, has developed a device that can monitor a patient’s oxygen levels and alert medical staff when levels drop and the patient is at risk for pulmonary distress.
  • Insectary2

    Research Briefs

    March 16, 2017, 10:01 AM by Donna Ramirez
    Dr. Ping Wu, PhD, professor of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, and Nikos Vasilakis, PhD, associate professor of Pathology, have uncovered the mechanisms that the Zika virus uses to alter brain development.
  • Zikarooney

    UTMB awarded $10 million from CDC to help stop spread of vector-borne diseases

    February 17, 2017, 16:10 PM by Donna Ramirez
    To help stop the spread of diseases carried by arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes and ticks, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention awarded UTMB $10 million to establish the Western Gulf Center of Excellence for Vector-Borne Diseases. The center’s work will protect public health in the region, the nation and beyond.
  • Salmonella

    UTMB develops an oral vaccine against Salmonella

    January 19, 2017, 17:32 PM by Donna Ramirez
    UTMB researchers have developed a vaccine against salmonella poisoning designed to be taken by mouth. The findings are detailed in an article published in Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology.
  • cryptosporidium

    Research Briefs - December

    December 20, 2016, 14:18 PM by KirstiAnn Clifford
    UTMB is the winner of a Grand Challenges Explorations grant, an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The $100,000 grant will help Alejandro Castellanos-Gonzalez, PhD, assistant professor at UTMB, and his team pursue an innovative global health and development research project aimed at defining targets for drug development against a diarrhea-causing parasite.
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    UTMB study offers new insight into how Alzheimer’s disease begins

    December 20, 2016, 14:18 PM by Donna Ramirez
    A new UTMB study offers important insight into how Alzheimer’s disease begins within the brain. The researchers found a relationship between inflammation, a toxic protein and the onset of the disease. The study also identified a way that doctors can detect early signs of Alzheimer’s by looking at the back of patients’ eyes.
  • Plague

    UTMB researchers develop new candidate vaccines against the plague

    November 21, 2016, 07:53 AM by Donna Ramirez
    UTMB researchers have developed new potential vaccines that protect animals against the bacteria that causes the deadly plague. These findings are detailed in NPJ Vaccines.
  • Opiates

    Research Briefs - November

    November 21, 2016, 07:53 AM by KirstiAnn Clifford
    There has been a three-fold increase in prescriptions of opiate painkillers among older adults for chronic pain not related to cancer. Yong Fang Kuo, PhD, and Dr. Mukaila Raji, professors of internal medicine in the Division of Geriatric Medicine, were awarded $1.4 million from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to conduct the first nationally representative study to examine variations in use of opiates in older adults and their relationship to outcomes, different state regulations and federal policy.
  • UTMB Nurse Latha Joy administers the HPV vaccine to patient Evelyn Perez while Dr. Abbey Berenson explains that a series of three injections is necessary for complete protection.

    Baby's checkup and a shot for mom

    October 19, 2016, 10:12 AM by Christopher Smith Gonzalez
    In the first months of a baby’s life, parents usually concentrate on their newborn’s health. But the postpartum period is also a good time for mom to catch up on an important vaccination for herself. The many doctor’s visits needed for a newborn present a convenient way for mom to get all three shots of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine
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    Research Briefs

    October 19, 2016, 10:12 AM by KirstiAnn Clifford
    Dr. Elena Volpi, director of UTMB’s Sealy Center on Aging, received a $2.7 million grant from the National Institute on Aging for a five-year project that will identify the mechanisms that can accelerate loss of muscle size, strength and physical function in older adults with Type 2 diabetes and those who have been hospitalized.
  • Ebola

    Research Briefs - September

    September 22, 2016, 11:10 AM by KirstiAnn Clifford
    Thomas Geisbert, PhD, in collaboration with Arbutus Biopharma Corporation, has protected nonhuman primates against Ebola Sudan four days after exposure to the virus. The study results, which were recently published in Nature Microbiology, demonstrated that the treatment was effective at a point when animals had detectable levels of the virus in their system and were at an advanced stage of disease.
  • Broken iPhone

    Digital forms of dating violence on the rise: What school nurses need to know

    September 22, 2016, 11:09 AM by Donna Ramirez
    Many teens experience physical or sexual abuse within their romantic relationships, and now dating violence can also be perpetrated digitally by harassing, stalking or controlling a romantic partner via technology and social media.
  • Barrows

    A Zika treatment could already be on the market

    August 17, 2016, 13:56 PM by Christopher Smith Gonzalez
    The latest research from UTMB scientists found that a drug to treat Zika virus infections could already exist and be available on the market. A team of researchers, led by Dr. Mariano A. Garcia-Blanco, a professor and chair of the biochemistry and molecular biology department at UTMB, and Shelton S. Bradrick, an assistant professor in the department, tested more than 770 different U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved therapeutics and found that more than 20 of those decreased Zika virus.
  • Brain copy

    Research Briefs - August

    August 17, 2016, 13:56 PM by KirstiAnn Clifford
    Rakez Kayed, PhD, was recently awarded $1.9 million from the NIH’s National Institute on Aging to study the formation and propagation of tau oligomeric strains in Alzheimer’s disease. Brain cells depend on tau protein to form highways for the cells to receive nutrients and get rid of waste.
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    Research Briefs - July

    July 21, 2016, 08:36 AM by KirstiAnn Clifford
    A new study by UTMB researchers found that pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) therapy among older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is underutilized, despite its health benefits and cost effectiveness.
  • CubaResearch

    UTMB to train Cuban scientists: Project to protect and improve health in the Caribbean and Gulf regions

    June 21, 2016, 14:49 PM by Raul Reyes
    Thanks to a $1.3 million agreement, researchers from UTMB’s National Biocontainment Training Center will embark on a two-year research development program to collaborate with and help train Cuban scientists at the Instituto Pedro Kouri in Havana to better fight infectious diseases, including the Zika virus, which is currently infecting millions internationally.