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Aging in Mexico: COVID-19MHAS Fact: Sheet 23-1, July 2023


The Mexican Health and Aging Study

The Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS) is a national study of adults aged 50 and older in Mexico (n=15,000) that has produced over 380 publications. The first longitudinal study of older Mexicans with a broad socioeconomic perspective, MHAS was designed to evaluate the impact of disease on health, function, and mortality.

Six waves of data have been collected between 2001 and 2021. A sub-sample of the 2018 wave was used for the ancillary study on cognitive aging (Mex- Cog 2021, n=4,066). MHAS is supported by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging (R01AG018016) and the Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI) in Mexico. Mex-Cog is supported by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging (NIH R01AG051158).

Global Outcomes

  • As of January 2023, more than 659 million cumulative cases and more than 6.6 cumulative deaths worldwide
  • Covid-19 prevalence 3x higher in high income countries than other countries
  • 25% increase in prevalence of anxiety and depression worldwide
  • In 2020, more than 144 million lost jobs and lost working hours equivalent to 255 million full time jobs

In Mexico

  • As of January 2023, more than 7.2 million cumulative cases and more than 331,000 cumulative deaths in Mexico
  • Vaccine doses administered: 226, 063, 079
  • People receiving at least 1 dose: 99,071,001
  • Percent of population receiving at least 1 dose: 77.53% 

FindingsMeg-Cog 2021

Loneliness & Depression

Compared to how they felt in 2018 older adults who had COVID-19 reported more depressive symptoms in 2021 but felt less lonely. Those who did not have COVID-19 reported about the same depressive symptoms compared to 2018, and less loneliness.

7.9% Respondents reported having Covid-19

54.1% Respondents reported that others in their household had covid-19

Changes in Support & Financial Challenges

Respondents who had Covid-19 were more likely to miss payments of all types than those who had not. More respondents who had Covid-19 received help (e.g., running errands) and were more likely to have others in their household who had Covid-19. 

Future Studies

  • What is the trajectory of cognitive and physical function of older adults who got COVID-19 compared to those who did not?
  • How did the pandemic affect older adults’ mental and physical health, as well as their savings, wealth, and outlook (e.g., retirement plans)?
  • What is the long-term prevalence of chronic dieases of those who got COVID-19? How does this prevalence compare for those who received vaccines and those who did not?

Current Statistics on Covid-19 in Mexico

Acknowledgements

  • Brandon O'Grady, MS
  • Alejandra Michaels Obregon, MS
  • Rebeca Wong, PhD
  • Amber McIlwain, MS
  • Roxann Grover, MA

References

The Mexican Health and Aging Study

Contact Us

World Health Organization / Pan American Health Organization (WHO/PAHO) Collaborating Center on Aging and Health
301 University Blvd.
Galveston, TX 77555-0177
P: (409) 747-0008
E: whopaho.aging@utmb.edu

Supported by:
UTMB Sealy Center on Aging logo

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