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The Forum on Aging


The Annual Forum on Aging, now in its 26th year, informs gerontology researchers and the community about aging research at UTMB.

Event Info 
  • Stay tuned for 2024 details to be announced.
  • Event Questions? Contact: Stephanie Burt, MS, at (409) 266-9675 or stburt@utmb.edu
  • Editing Support? Contact: Amber McIlwain, MS, at (409) 266-9625 or asmcilwa@utmb.edu
  Photo Gallery
The Forum on Aging allows faculty, fellows, and students to showcase their research and inform the UTMB community about the aging research being conducted. It is also a great networking event and opportunity to learn about the research resources available from the Sealy Center on Aging and Research Services. Monetary awards for best student and fellow posters will be given, sponsored by the Sealy Center on Aging, the Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Women’s Health, and Sigma Xi.

PAST PROGRAMS:   2023 |  2022 |  2021  2019 |  2018 |  2017 |   2016 |  2015

2023 STUDENT POSTER WINNERS

NamePoster TitleCategory
Mohanad AlbayyaaANDROGEN DEPRIVATION THERAPY AND THE RISK OF RHEUMATIC AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES IN MEN WITH PROSTATE CANCER Education & Health System Improvement
Amy ArceneauxEXOGENOUS ESTROGEN TREATMENT BENEFITS POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN Women’s Health/Gender Differences
Veronica HernandezTHE EFFECT OF FINANCIAL STRAIN AND LANGUAGE OF INTERVIEW ON DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS IN MEXICAN AMERICAN OLDER ADULTS Health Disparities – Mental Health
Thao HoangOROPHARYNGEAL CANCER REGIONAL DIFFERENCES AMONG OLDER ADULTS IN THE UNITED STATES Health Disparities – Health Care
Shrinath KadamangudiSELECTIVE NEURONAL VULNERABILITY TO TOXIC TAU OLIGOMERS IN HUMAN SYNAPSES Neuroscience
Briana LacyCLIMATE CHANGE AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FOR HURRICANES AMONG NURSING HOMES IN TEXAS Rehabilitation & Recovery
Mathilda Nicot- CartsonisRACIAL AND GEOGRAPHIC DISPARITIES IN DIAGNOSTIC AND SCREENING MAMMOGRAPHY UTILIZATION WITH OUTCOMES AMONG MEDICARE ELIGIBLE BREAST CANCER POPULATION Health Disparities – Chronic Diseases
Emma RowlinsonFACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH MAMMOGRAM AND PAPANICOLAOU TESTING AMONG OLDER MEXICAN AMERICANS Women’s Health/Gender Differences
Jacqueline SilvaCALCINEURIN INHIBITION REDUCES PREVALENCE OF NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES Implementation
Zachary Von RuffSHORT-TERM MUSCLE DISUSE IN HUMANS INCREASES GENE EXPRESSION ASSOCIATED WITH MUSCLE ATROPHY WHILE DOWNREGULATING GENES LINKED TO MITOCHONDRIAL AND AMINO ACID METABOLISM Muscle Aging

2023 POST-GRADUATE, FELLOW & RESIDENT WINNERS

NamePoster Title

Kristen McGovern

EFFECTS OF PHOSPHODIESTERASE-5 INHIBITOR ON PLASMA METABOLOME AND PROTEOME OF HEALTHY PARTICIPANTS

Ekta Singh

UNDERSTANDING PARACRINE REJUVENATION IN SENESCENCE INDUCED BY LOW FREQUENCY ULTRASOUND

2022 STUDENT POSTER WINNERS

NamePoster TitleCategory

Paige Downer

THE ROLE OF COMMUNITIES OF RESIDENCE, SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS, AND INDIVIDUAL RISK FACTORS ON OLDER MEXICAN ADULTS’ LIKELIHOOD OF HIGH DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS

Health Disparities – Mental Health

Amy Givan

PHYSICAL FUNCTION RECOVERY AND THE ROLE OF
SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH ON FUNCTIONAL
RECOVERY AFTER AN ACUTE HOSPITALIZATION
AMONG OLDER MEXICAN AMERICANS
Rehabilitation & Recovery
Mariela
Gutierrez
LIFETIME OCCUPATION AND ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY
AMONG MEXICAN ADULTS: RURAL/URBAN
DIFFERENCES
Health Disparities – Chronic Diseases & Mortality
John 
Johnson

STEROID-FREE IMMUNOSUPPRESSION AND THE RISK OF REJECTION IN ELDERLY RENAL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

Implementation & Outcomes Research
Shrinath 
Kadamangudi

UPTAKE OF TAU-OLIGOMERS IS INCREASED IN THE
PRESENCE OF SOLUBLE AMYLOID-BETA-OLIGOMERS
IN HUMAN SYNAPSES
Neuroscience

Hanna Kalenta

EXERCISE METABOLOMIC RESPONSE IN MICE WITH
CONSTITUTIVELY ACTIVE MUSCLE MTORC1
Muscle & Metabolism
Yejin 
Kang 

ASSOCIATIONS OF MINORITY-SERVING STATUS WITH
QUALITY OF CARE AND STAFFING LEVELS IN NURSING
HOMES
Health Disparities – Health Care Services
Sean 
Kilroe

AN ANALYSIS OF METHODS USED TO RECRUIT
HEALTHY MALES AND FEMALES AGED BETWEEN 50
TO 65 YEARS OLD FROM THE GREATER HOUSTON-GALVESTON
AREA FOR AN ONGOING RANDOMIZED
CONTROLLED TRIAL
Implementation & Outcomes Research

Kseniya 
Masterova

ENHANCING FLOW-MEDIATED DILATION ANALYSIS BY
OPTIMIZING AN OPEN-SOURCE SOFTWARE WITH
AUTOMATED EDGE DETECTION

Muscle & Metabolism

Kanwal Momin

THE IMPACT OF INSOMNIA SYMPTOMS ON OBESITY BY
GENDER AMONG MEXICANS AGED 50 AND OLDER,
2015-2018
Women’s Health/Gender Differences
David 
Parkhurst

ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN SUN-EXPOSED SKIN AND
BRAF MUTATIONS REGARDING MELANOMA AT UTMB

Education

Jacqueline 
Silva

REDUCED PREVALENCE OF DEMENTIA IN PATIENTS
TREATED WITH A CALCINEURIN INHIBITOR
Neuroscience

Juan Ventura

NATIVITY DIFFERENCES IN THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HANDGRIP STRENGTH AND COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT IN OLDER MEXICAN AMERICANS FOR 20 YEARS OF FOLLOW-UP

Rehabilitation & Recovery

2022 POST-GRADUATE, FELLOW & RESIDENT WINNERS

NamePoster TitleCategory
Anna Fracassi
SUB-CHRONIC FK506 TREATMENT REDUCES AΒ AND
TAU PATHOLOGY IN 7-MONTH-OLD 3XTG-AD MICE
Neuroscience

Kristen McGovern

DENSITY OF HISTAMINERGIC TUBEROMAMMILLARY NEURONS IN A RODENT MODEL OF BRAIN INJURY ASSOCIATED FATIGUE AND ALTERED COGNITION (BIAFAC)

Neuroscience

Karen Schlag

IMPACTS FROM DEMENTIA-RELATED STIGMA AND DIRECT SUPPORT SEEKING ON FAMILY CAREGIVER PROCESSES OF STRESS AND COPING

Education

Mandi Sonnenfeld

VISION IMPAIRMENT AND FALLS AMONG OLDER MEXICAN AMERICANS

Rehabilitation & Recovery

2021 STUDENT POSTER WINNERS

NamePoster TitleCategory
Peyton
Armstrong
National Trends in Osteoporosis Medication Use Among Medicare Beneficiaries with and without Alzheimer’s Disease/Related DementiasDisparities in Cognitive Function 
Timothy
Baumgartner
Targeting the Nav1.6:GSK3B PPI Interface to Mitigate Hippocampal Hyperexcitability in Early-Stage Alzheimer’s DiseaseNeuroscience
Mariela
Gutierrez
The Influence of Birth Cohort Differences in Education and Occupation Type on the Cognitive Function of Mexican Older AdultsDisparities in Cognitive Function
Shrinath
Kadamangudi
Exploring Tau Pathology in Primary Age-Related Tauopathy (Part)Neuroscience
Kseniya
Masterova
The Effect of Short Duration Bed Rest on Arterial Structure and Function in Older AdultsRehabilitation & Recovery
Warona
Mathuba
Racial and Ethnic Differences in the Improvement in Daily Activities During a Nursing Home StayDisparities in Physical Function
Kanwal
Momin
Heightened Sleep Problems are Associated with a Greater Odds in Developing Obesity Among Mexican Adults Aged 50 and OlderImplementation
Chinedu
Onwudebe
Diabetes Complications and Pain Among Mexican Americans Aged 75 and OlderDisparities in Health Care & Suffering
Robert
Rodriguez
Health Disparities Experiences Among Sexual Minorities: National Health Interview Survey, 2017-2018Disparities in Other Chronic Conditions
Megan
Rutherford
Body Mass Index and Frailty Among Older Mexican Americans: Findings From an 18-Year Follow-upMuscle Aging
Rehal
Tekeste
Ticagrelor is More Effective Than Clopidogrel in Carrier of Nonfunctional Cyp2c19 Allele Who has Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndrome – Case Report and Literature ReviewImplementation
Juan
Ventura
Handgrip Strength and Cognitive Decline in Aging Mexican Americans with Long-Term Follow-upRehabilitation & Recovery
Jordan
Westra
National Trends and Patterns of Cessation of Prescription Opioid Use Among Medicare Beneficiaries, 2013-2018Education

2021 POST-GRADUATE, FELLOW & RESIDENT WINNERS

NamePoster TitleCategory
Phillip
Cantu
Differential Item Functioning of the CSI’D in the MEXCOGNeuroscience
Aimalohi
Esechie
Trends in Prescribing Pattern of Opioid and Benzodiazepine Substitutes Among Medicare Part D Beneficiaries From 2013-2018: A Retrospective StudyImplementation
Anna
Fracassi
TREM2-Induced Activation of Microglia Contributes to Synaptic Resilience in Non-demented Individuals with Alzheimer’s NeuropathologyNeuroscience
Sagar
Gaikwad
HMGB1-Mediated Inflammaging Contributes to Age-related Cognitive DysfunctionsRehabilitation & Recovery
Imran
Sulemankhil
Heart Failure and Frailty in Older Mexican AmericansHealth Disparities

These guidelines will help you develop your poster presentation for the Forum on Aging. There are several ways to create a scientific poster, but its main purpose is to present your research in a clear and concise format that is easily read from a distance, usually 4 to 10 feet away.

Recommended Format

  • Title
  • Author(s) and Affiliations
  • Introduction (research problem, justification, research questions, objectives, hypothesis/expected results)
  • Purpose (you can include the purpose in the introduction or as its own section)
  • Materials and Methods (study design, sampling information, brief description of procedures and analyses, brief description of what was collected/measured/observed, i.e., the data)
  • Results and Discussion (findings; explain the results)
  • Conclusion (answer your objectives—this is not a summary of the work)
  • References (limit to a few key references that are cited in your poster)
  • Acknowledgments (funding/research grant, individuals who helped you)
Software

BioRender is a web-based program that helps you create scientific figures and posters. To access UTMB's BioRender license, log in through the UTMB login portal. This tutorial provides design tips for creating better scientific posters. There are also tip sheets: BioRender 101 and Top Design Tips for Better Posters (these links might require your login to access them).

Templates

UTMB also has templates you can use to create your poster: (click “Poster template” at the bottom of the page). Your poster must fit the poster board provided at the Forum. The board is 6 feet long and 4 feet tall. Handouts are optional and can include the abstract, reference list, or entire poster reduced in size.

Things to Remember

Plan the flow. Your poster should follow a logical progression from introduction to conclusion. The flow of information on posters generally moves from top to bottom and left to right. Consider using arrows if you deviate from this standard.

Readability. Important information should be readable from about 10 feet away. The text should be clear and to the point. Use bullets, numbering, and headlines to improve readability.

  • Fonts: Use no more than two fonts. Stick with basic fonts, such as Times New Roman (for serif) or Arial (for sans-serif). Avoid elaborate, hard-to-read, or cartoon-like fonts. Be consistent in your use of bold, italics, or underlining.
  • Font size guidance: Do not use a font size smaller than 24pt. Be consistent, e.g., use the same font size for all headings, use the same font size for all body text, etc. References, acknowledgments, and table and figure captions can have a smaller font than the body text.
  • Text alignment: Left justify the body text. Do not fully justify (like a newspaper column); that is harder to read. Titles, headings, and captions can be centered, but not the body text.
  • Effective use of graphics: Keep text to a minimum. Instead, use figures and tables to engage your audience and focus their attention. Include a variety of figures, such as graphs, charts, diagrams, maps, images, or photographs. For example, illustrate your techniques or experimental plans as diagrams, organize data in tables, and present results in graphs or charts (followed by bullet points that summarize major findings). Only use high-quality and high-resolution figures; images and photographs should have a resolution of at least 300 dpi. Number and title figures and tables; include captions below that describe the figure or explain the data or information in the table.

Aesthetics matter. Your poster should have a consistent and clean layout. Balance text, graphics, and white space.

Tell the story of your research.

  • What problem or question did you address?
  • What approach did you take?
  • Did you use any unusual techniques?
  • What did you find out? What did the results tell you?
  • What is the most important/interesting/astounding finding from your research project?
  • Why was this project worth doing?
  • What conclusions did you draw based on your research?
  • If you could continue with the project, what would you do next?

Few people will know as much about your topic as you. Make the story of your research easy for them to understand. A good poster will stimulate questions and conversation. Be prepared to answer questions!

Printing Your Poster

Email your poster to print.order@utmb.edu. Include your phone number and a project or class number for payment.

**The maximum height for UMTB Print Shop printing is 42” (3.5’).

ALLOW FOR A 3-DAY TURNAROUND TIME AFTER YOU SUBMIT YOUR POSTER ONLINE. Posters ordered through the UTMB Print Shop will be delivered to the Moody Medical Library, 2nd Floor Access Center.

Presenting

You will be given a program, specifying the location number for your poster, at the registration desk located at the entrance of the dining room. Remember to sign in when you register. You will pin your poster on a 6’ x 4’ board set up in the Levin Hall Dining Room. The boards have a metallic frame and dark blue material background. Pins will be provided.

You can register and set up your poster as early as 2:00 PM. Poster viewing is from 4:00-5:30 PM. Refreshments and hors d’oeuvres will be served. Judging will occur from 4:00-5:00 PM. The presentation of student and fellow poster awards will begin at 5:30 PM. You must remove your poster at the conclusion of the poster session.

If you have questions, contact Stephanie Burt, MS at (409) 266-9675 or stburt@utmb.edu. If you need assistance with poster editing, contact Amber McIlwain, MS at (409) 266-9625 or asmcilwa@utmb.edu.