Moody Medical Library

Academic Resources | Blocker History of Medicine Collections


Microscope Collection

American Firms

Bausch & Lomb Optical Company

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. Microscope 1

This is the earliest Bausch & Lomb instrument in the collection. The tripod base supports a round pillar and round limb, attached by a compass joint. The body-tube with a triple nosepiece moves by rackwork, and the fine adjustment is by the screw on the top of the limb. Below the round stage are the swinging condenser and double mirror. It comes with a wooden carrying case and accessories. About 1887. Signed: Bausch & Lomb Optical Co.


Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. Microscope 2

Based on the Bausch & Lomb Continental model, the instrument has a horseshoe foot and a round pillar, both made of cast iron. The limb and the square stage are attached to the pillar by a compass joint. The body-tube, with a double nosepiece, moves by rackwork and fine adjustment is by the micrometer screw on top of the limb. It comes with a carrying case. About 1910. Signed: Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. Rochester, N.Y. 69085.


Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. Microscope 3

The collection includes two all-brass Continental model microscopes by Bausch & Lomb, which are similar to the above. The instrument (1.044) with serial number 40315, and instrument (1.045), with a serial number 26124, date from the turn of the 20th century.


Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. Microscope 4

The instrument (1.044) with serial number 40315, and instrument (1.045), with a serial number 26124, date from the turn of the 20th century.


Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. Microscope 5

The horseshoe base and the pillar, cast as one piece, and the limb are made of iron and painted black. The brass arm supports the body-tube, which has a triple nosepiece. The coarse adjustment is by rackwork, and the screw for fine adjusting is on top of the limb. Below the square stage are a swinging Abbe condenser, an iris diaphragm, and a double mirror. The microscope was purchased in 1914 by George Hermann III, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, when he was a medical student. It comes with a wooden carrying case and accessories. Signed: Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. Rochester, N.Y. The serial number 99168 is at the end of the tube.


James W. Queen & Company

James W. Queen (1813-1890) established his business in 1853 and sold scientific supplies and instruments. He was the American agent for the R & J Beck microscopes and carried instruments by other makers (Zentmayer, Hartnack, and Nachet) as well. The Acme microscopes were also marketed under the name of Queen.


James W. Queen & Co. Microscope

This small microscope has a Y-shaped foot and double pillars of cast iron (cast as one piece) and painted black. The curved limb supports the body-tube, which moves by rackwork. The body is fitted with a draw-tube and a double nosepiece (one missing). A rotating mirror is attached to the tailpiece. About 1885. Signed on the rectangular stage: Jas. W. Queen & Co. Phila. 943.


Spencer Lens Company

Spencer Lens Company was founded by Herbert R. Spencer (1849-1900) and his associates in 1895. The company was the continuation of the firm established in the 1840s by his father, Charles A. Spencer (1813-1881), who is considered the first American microscope maker. It is estimated that the company had produced about 10,000 instruments by 1909.


Spencer Lens Co. Microscope 1

The horseshoe base and the pillar are cast as one piece. The curved limb is attached to the base by means of trunnions. Below the square stage are the Abbe condenser, iris diaphragm, and a mirror. The body-tube with a triple nosepiece moves by rackwork, and the fine focusing is by a micrometer screw. No case and accessories. About 1930. Signed: Spencer Buffalo U.S.A. 206665.


Spencer Lens Co. Microscope 2

There is an earlier Spencer instrument in the collection (1.051), with similar features to the above, which may date from about 1920. Signed: Spencer Microscope ALOE Co. Sales Agents No 61515.