• A nurse in black scrubs talks to a patient sitting behind a screen at an improvised dockside clinic

    Docside Clinic brings primary care to underserved maritime community

    University of Texas Medical Branch researcher Dr. Shannon Guillot-Wright was recently awarded a $660,000 grant from the Centers for Disease Control to fund a five-year research project to address health disparities for commercial fishermen.

  • UTMB Awarded Project Agreement Up to $24.7M from the U.S. Department of Defense to Develop mRNA Vaccines to Prevent Biological Threat Agent Diseases

    UTMB has been awarded an agreement up to nearly $25 million from the U.S. Department of Defense’s (DoD) Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (JPEO-CBRND) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) (within the Administration for Strategic Preparedness and Response (ASPR)), for their efforts in the collaborative development of vaccines to protect against infection by Ebola (EBOV), Sudan (SUDV), Marburg (MARV), and Lassa (LASV) viruses. This project award was executed via Other Transaction Authority (OTA) to UTMB through the Medical CBRN Defense Consortium (MCDC).

  • A blue image of letters and test tubes

    UTMB and HDT Bio awarded prototype project funding worth up to $87.4M from the U.S. government to develop saRNA vaccine technology

    The University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) has been awarded a project agreement worth up to $87.4 million by the U.S. Department of Defense’s (DOD) Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (JPEO-CBRND) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) within the Administration for Strategic Preparedness and Response (ASPR), through the Medical CBRN Defense Consortium (MCDC) Other Transaction Authority (OTA), for the development of a vaccine technology against advanced and emerging viral threats. Two deadly viruses of significance to military personnel will be targeted for vaccine protection. These are Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) and Nipah virus (NiV).

  • Dr. Michael P. Sheetz Robert A Welch Distinguished University Chair in Chemistry in the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

    Sheetz wins Pearse Prize

    The Royal Microscopical Society (RMS) has awarded Dr. Michael P. Sheetz the Pearse Prize for his “long and illustrious career in mechanobiological research”.

  • UTMB research links COVID-19 pandemic to poor mental health in adolescents

    A new University of Texas Medical Branch study links COVID-19 restrictions to poor mental health in adolescents. “While it was necessary to prevent the pre-vaccine spread of COVID-19, removing children from school was not without consequences,” said Dr. Jeff Temple, Vice Dean for research at UTMB’s School of Nursing and the director of the Center for Violence Prevention. Temple is the lead author of the study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

  • An image of a pill capsule full of gears

    UTMB drug discovery partnership awarded $56 million grant

    Thanks to a $56 million grant, the University of Texas Medical Branch and global health care company Novartis will enhance their work together to discover drugs to fight off the next pandemic. The grant comes from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and is one of nine such grants awarded by NIAID to establish Antiviral Drug Discovery (AViDD) Centers for Pathogens of Pandemic Concern.

  • A man cluctching his chest during a heart attack

    Heart attack mortality rate higher in the US compared to other high-income countries

    When it comes to treating heart attacks, U.S. hospitals may have the latest tech and low readmission rates, but the country’s mortality rate is one of the highest among the nations included in a new study. The study, published May 4 in The BMJ, found substantial differences in care for heart attack patients across six high income countries despite international agreement on how heart attacks should be treated.