Treating Children WELL

Library of articles, blogs and news about improving children's health

  • Congratulations Dr. Victor Reyes on the Professor Piper Award

    July 6, 2018, 12:46 PM by Mary Urbani

    May 2017
    Victor Reyes, PhD, was selected as a 2017 Piper Professor by the Minnie Stevens Piper Foundation. Dr. Reyes is a professor in the Departments of Microbiology and Immunology and Pediatrics. In 2016, he was chosen as a member of the University of Texas System Kenneth I. Shine, M.D., Academy of Health Science Education. Established in 1958, the prestigious Piper Professor Awards honor 10 effective and dedicated professors each year from two- and four-year colleges and universities in Texas.  


  • Resources for Help after the Santa Fe High School Shooting

    May 23, 2018, 09:26 AM by Virginia Niebuhr, PhD

    The Department of Pediatrics offers students, families, care-givers and educators a set of resources to help children and teens following the recent trauma of the Santa Fe High School shooting. If you have concerns about your child or teen, contact your pediatric provider for help finding the best resources for your family.

    Managing your distress in the aftermath of a shooting 
    Disaster and Trauma Responses of Children 
    Disaster and Trauma Responses of Parents 
    Parent Guidelines for Helping Youth after the Recent Shooting 
    Helping Teens with Traumatic Grief: Tips for Caregivers 
    Talking to Children about Shootings 
    Tips for Parents on Media Exposure

    These resources were prepared by the American Psychological Association, the American Counseling Association, and the National Child Traumatic Stress Network.

  • UTMB NICU attains top designation

    May 16, 2018, 15:17 PM by Mary Urbani
    The neonatal intensive care unit at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has achieved a Level IV designation, the highest ranking, from the Texas Department of State Health Services. For more information click here. 
  • from SAMSHA

    Bringing Hope to Children with Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)

    May 10, 2018, 08:19 AM by Mary Urbani

    The theme for this year’s National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day is “Partnering for Health and Hope Following Trauma.”  Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) are events, such as abuse, neglect, violence, mental illness, hunger, substance abuse, incarceration and even divorce. These events trigger toxic stress which can have a lasting, negative impact on the health and well-being of child, lasting into adulthood.  A high number of ACES can lead to early death.

    Unfortunately for our children, ACES are common experiences.  In the Kaiser Study sample, 40% reported two or more ACES and 12.5% experienced four or more. There is a strong relationship between ACES and the risk of attempted suicides.  That risk follows children into adulthood and is increased by the abuse of alcohol, drugs and depression.

    In the article Resilience, the Biology of Stress and the Science of Hope, the focus on strategies that we as a community can use to bring hope to children in spite of the circumstance, hope that builds resilience in a world of adversity.  (Dube, 2001) The strategies developed are:

  • "Defining resilience as the “ability to thrive, adapt and cope despite tough and stressful times”
  • Changing the question from “what is wrong with you?”to “what happened to you? “
  • Recognizing toxic stress as the largest public health issue of our generation
  • Building critical community collaborations such as, local healthcare, schools, and law-enforcement
  • Promoting safe, stable and nurturing relationships and environments
  • Preventing care-takers from passing on their toxic stress to their children.
  • Promoting Hope"
  • For more information on ACES go to SAMHSA 
    If you have concerns for your child, contact your primary care provider or mental health expert. 

    Dube SR, Anda RF, Felitti VJ, Chapman DP, Williamson DF, Giles WH. Childhood Abuse, Household Dysfunction, and the Risk of Attempted Suicide Throughout the Life Span Findings From the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study. JAMA. 2001;286(24):3089–3096. doi:10.1001/jama.286.24.3089