Andreas Vesalius SocietyJohn P. McGovern Academy of Oslerian Medicine


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The mission of the Vesalius Society is to foster camaraderie through social events, scholarly development, service, support and encouragement.

Willed Body Memorial Ceremony

The Willed Body Memorial Ceremony celebrates the lives of those who have generously donated their bodies to science and medicine and is sponsored by the Andreas Vesalius Osler Student Society along with the Willed Body Memorial Ceremony Committee. Students from various schools across campus, including PT, PA and SOM, through their musical talent and artistic impression will lend an inspirational air to the program. All are welcome to attend this special ceremony.

Faculty Roast

A faculty roast is held annually in the Clinical Sciences Auditorium. Students reenact some of the best moments of first and second year, as they “roast” their beloved professors, fellow classmates, and UTMB. Funds raised support the Rainbow Connection (a non-profit 501 (c)(3) organization dedicated to the families and children living with cancer or blood disorders.)

Roster of Members

The current roster of the Andreas Vesalius Student Society is available by contacting the McGovern Academy office.

vesalius

Andreas Vesalius
Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) was a Belgian anatomist who is considered the founder of modern anatomy. His most noteworthy work, "De humani corporis fabrica", revolutionized the science of medicine and laid the foundation for modern human anatomy with accurate and detailed descriptions of the human body. Vesalius corrected many of Galen's descriptions finding that his century old work was based on animal dissections. Vesalius introduced the "hands-on" approach where the physician performed the dissection, instead of observing and reading from a Galenic text, which lead him to master the art of dissection and define human anatomy.

A Way of Life

The vision of the Osler Student Societies is to provide developing physicians insight into "A Way of Life", described by Sir William Osler, not through formal lecture, but through the guidance of mentors in contact with students within and outside their academic setting.